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Speakers Bureau

 

Most of the the MTT Technical committees have identified technical experts who are available to provide lectures for local chapter meetings. The lecture topics and speakers are listed in the table below. Each TC listed is also linked to speaker contact information as well as a brief abstract of the available talks. Limited funding is available through the MTT-Society for speaker support of members of the Speakers Bureau.

 

MTT Chapter Officers desiring a Speaker need to do the following:
- Contact Speaker and pick date and place for Talk
- Send e-mail Invitation to Speaker
- Provide a meal and possibly local transportation to Speaker at time of Talk
- After the Talk the Speaker will present his/her "After Talk Report" and IEEE Expense Form to the Speaker's Bureau Administrator,
Dr. L.R. Whicker This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Additional Speaker Programs

There are speaker programs in addition to the Speakers Bureau that may be of service for your chapter.

MTT-S/EuMA Joint Sponsored Speakers

Distinguished Microwave Lecturers

Emeritus Distinguished Microwave Lecturers.


Speakers Bureau Lecture Reimbursement

Speakers Bureau lecturers should follow the procedures described to obtain Speaker Reimbursement

Available Speakers Bureau Topics and Speakers

TOPICAL AREA

Speaker

e-mail

MTT-1 Computer Aided Design

 

 

Terahertz Technology Fact or Fiction

Dr. Chris Snowden

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Physical Models for Microwave and Millimeter- Wave CAD

Dr. Chris Snowden

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Simulation and Modeling of Electrically Large Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Systems

Dr. Michael Steer

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave CAD Using Space Mapping Technology

Dr. John W. Bandler

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Global Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Power Amplifiers

Dr. Almudena Suarez

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Nonlinear Analog Behavioral Modeling of Microwave Devices and Circuits

 

X-Parameters: the new paradigm for interoperable measurement, modeling, and simulation of nonlinear microwave and RF components

Dr. David Root

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-2 Microwave Acoustics

 

 

Wireless, Passive Surface Acoustic Wave Tags and Sensors

Dr. Donald C. Malocha

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF Front-Ends for Multi-Mode, Multi-Band Cellular Phones

Dr. Clemens Ruppel

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

SiP/SoC Integration of RF SAW/BAW Filters

Prof. Dr. Ken-Ya Hashimoto

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Wireless SAW-Based Sensing and Identification

Prof. Dr. Leonhard M. Reindl

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New Technique for Measuring Q and a Comparison of Different Resonator Technologies from MEMs to BAW

Dr. Rich Ruby

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

SAW and BAW Technologies for RF Filter Applications: A Review of the Relative Strengths and Weaknesses

Dr. Robert Aigner

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The Latest Status of RF MEMS, Focusing on the Next Step

Takeo Oita

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MTT-3 Microwave Photonics

 

 

Techniques and Applications of Analog Optical Links

Dr. Charles Cox, III

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Fiberoptic Links for Satellite Communications

Dr. Afshin S. Daryoush

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Optoelectric Ultra-Wideband RF/Wireless Communications

Dr. Chi H. Lee

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Synergy of Optical and Microwave Technologies

Dr. Tibor Berceli

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-4 Terahertz Techniques

 

 

Terahertz Technology in Outer and Inner Space

Dr. Peter H. Siegel

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MTT-5 Microwave High-Power Techniques

 

 

Minimizing Power Amplifier Memory Effects, or Alternate:

Linearization: Reducing Distortion in Power Amplifiers

Dr. Allen Katz

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Design and Performance of Microwave and Millimeter-wave High Efficiency Power Amplifiers

Dr. James Komiak

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF/DSP Co-Designed Power Amplifiers/Transmitters for Advanced Wireless and Satellite Applications

Dr. F. M. Ghannouchi

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

An Enabling Technology for 3G+ Systems

Dr. F M. Ghannouchi

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-6 Microwave & Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits

 

 

RF/Analog Circuit Design for Wireless Communication Networks

Dr. M. Madihian

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit Techniques and Technology

Dr. Shiban K. Koul,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-7 Microwave & Millimeter-Wave Solid State Devices

 

 

Contact Committee Chair

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-8 Filters and Passive Components

 

 

Analysis and Design of Dielectric Resonators and Filters

Dr. Chi Wang

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Present and Future Filter Design Philosophy: Paradigm Shift in Progress

Dr. R.V. Snyder

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Computing and Enhancing Power Handling in Bandstop Filters

Dr. R.V. Snyder

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Waveguide Filters for Satellites

Prof. V. E. Boria-Esbert

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-9 Digital Signal Processing

 

 

Software Defined Radio for Microwave Applications: Explanation, Evolution, Design Details, Your Role in SDR, and Several Live Demonstrations

Dr. Jeffrey Pawlan

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-10 Biological Effects and Medical Applications

 

 

Terahertz Technology in Outer and Inner Space

Dr. Peter Siegel

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-11 Microwave Measurements

 

 

Non-Linear Measurements: From the Power Meter to the LSNA

Jan Verspechi and

Andrea Ferrero

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Measurements for Modeling

Dr. Dominique Schreurs

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Evaluating Errors and Uncertainties in RF & Microwave Measurements

Nick Ridler

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Fiber-Optic Links: Design and Measurement Issues

Dr. Stavros Iezekiel

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Metrology Developments for Future Wireless Technologies Nuno Carvalho

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF I-V Waveform Measurement and Engineering Paul Tasker This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-12 Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Packaging

 

 

T/R Modules Using 3D and SIP Packaging

Rick Sturdivant

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Signal Integrity Characterization Techniques Mike Resso

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-13 Microwave Ferrites

 

 

Ferrite Phase Shifters

Dr. Charles R. Boyd Jr.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Ferroelectric and Reconfigurable Antennas Dr. Jozef Modelski

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-14 Microwave Low-Noise Techniques

 

 

Ultra Low Noise, InP Field Effect Transistors Radio Astronomy Receivers: State -of-the - Art

Dr. Marian Pospieszalski

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

MTT-15 Microwave Field Theory

 

 

Leaky Modes and High-Frequency Effects on Microwave Integrated Circuits

David R. Jackson

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Geometrical Concepts in Teaching Electromagnetics

Prof. Peter Russer

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Metamaterials: Blue-Sky Chimera or Revolution in Microwaves and Photonics

Prof. Christopher Caloz

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Multi-Level Modeling for Complex Microwave/High-Speed Design

Prof. Wolfgang Hoefer

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Unification of Numerical Methods: A General Mathematical Framework for Derivations and New Scheme Developments

Prof. Zhizhang Chen

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-16 Microwave Systems

 

 

State-of-the-Art Time-Domain Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Nonlinear Components and Systems

Dr. Christopher P. Silva

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Sensors for Industrial Applications

Dr. Reinhard Knoechel

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Transmit/Receive Modules for Phased Array Antennas

Bruce Kopp

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Integrated Millimeter-Wave (Sub-) Systems for Future Satellite Communications

Dr. Arne F. Jacob

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Ferroelectric and Reconfigurable Antennas

Jozef W. Modelski

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-17 HF/VHF/UHF Technology

 

 

Microwave Phase Modulators and Shifters

Jozef W. Modelski

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

A Fully Monolithic HMIC Low Noise Amplifier

T. Boles

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Design of Darlington Based Silicon MMIC Gain Blocks

T. Boles

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF and Microwave Solid-State Control

Dr. R. Caverly

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

High Efficiency Amplification of Variable Envelope Signals for Modern Wireless Communications Systems: Doherty and ChireixRe-Visited

Dr. S.C. Cripps

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

High-Efficiency RF-Power Amplifiers

Dr. F.H. Raab

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Kahn-Technique Transmitters

Dr. F.H. Raab

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Low-Cost High-Efficiency HF Power Amplifiers

Dr. F.H. Raab

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Class E Switching-Mode High-Efficiency Power Amplifiers - from RF to Microwave (1 hr.)

N.O. Sokal

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RF Power Amplifiers, Class A through S - How They Operate, and When to Use Each (4 hr. Tutorial)

N.O. Sokal

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-18 Microwave Superconductivity

 

 

INACTIVE

 

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-19 Microwave Technology Business Issues

 

 

Engineering Your Retirement

Dr. Mike Golio

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-20 Wireless Communication

 

 

Recent Advances in Printed Antennas for Wireless and Satellite Communications

Dr. Rainee N. Simons

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The Future (and Direction of) Wireless Technologies Dr. Upkar Dhaliwal

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Software Defined Radio for Microwave Applications Explanation, Evolution, Design Details, Your Role in SDR,

and Several Live Demonstrations

Dr. Jeffrey Pawlan This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-21 MEMs

 

 

Three Dimensional Millimeter Wave Circuits

Dr. J. Robert Reid

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF MEMS Devices Using Piezoelectric Thin Films

Dr. Ronald G. Polcawich

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Distributed RF-MEMS Circuits

Dr. N. Scott Barker

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Micromachined Microwave and Millimeter Wave Circuit Design

Dr. Shiban K. Koul,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Noise in RF MEMS Circuits and Tunable Filters

Prof. Kamran Enteris

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New Directions in MEMS for RF Front-Ends and Sensors

Prof. Dimitrios Peroulis

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-22 Signal Generation and Frequency Conversion

 

 

Fundamental and Harmonic Mode Self-Oscillating Mixers

Prof. Carlos Saavedra

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Latest technology and technological challenges in oscillator design

Dr. Ajay Kumar Poddar This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-23 RFIC

 

 

Contact Committee Chair

Joseph Staudinger

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Towards Ultra Wide Tuning Range and Low Phase Noise mm-Wave VCOs: A Negative Capacitance and BiCMOS Perspective

Dr. Wqaleed Khalil This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-24 RFID Technologies

 

 

Inkjet-Printed Electronics

Dr. Mano Tentzeris,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Autonomous Wireless Sensors and RFID's: Energy harvesting, Material and Circuit Challenges

Dr. Apostolos Georgiadis

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

“Green RFID”: an enabling technology towards the Internet of Things (IoT) world

Luca Roselli

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MTT-25 RF Nanotechnology

 

 

Multiphysics Modeling of the Electromagnetic-Transport Problems in Nanodevices: A New Challenge in Computational Engineering

Prof. Luca Pierantoni

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-26 Wireless Energy Transfer and Conversion
Wireless Power Transmission: From Far-Field to Near-Field Prof. Jenshan Lin This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
MTT-27 Wireless-Enabled Automotive and Vehicular Applications

Presentation Abstracts

Committee MTT- 1: Computer Aided Design

Committee Chair: Michal Odyniec, Tel: 510-524-8373, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Chris Snowden, Univ. of Leeds, UK

Tel: 44-113-233-2001

Fax:: 44-113-233-2032

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Terahertz Technology Fact or Fiction

Abstract: The interest in exploring the spectrum above 100 GHz and below 10 THz is limited by the availability of suitable solid-state technologies. This presentation addresses the present state-of-the-art for active devices and integrating technologies in the range 100 GHZ to 2 THz.

Physical Models for Microwave and Millimeter- Wave CAD

Abstract: State-of-the-art modeling techniques for microwave and millimeter-wave transistors are presented together with an outline of their application in process-oriented CAD. The presentation will consider MESFET, HBT, and pHEMT devices in the frequency range 900 MHz to 140 GHz.



Dr. Michael Steer, North Carolina State University

Tel: 919-515-5191

Fax: 919-513-1979

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Simulation and Modeling of Electrically Large Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Systems

Abstract: Many of the grand challenges in the engineering of microwave and millimeter-wave circuits concerns the complexity of large systems with interacting electromagnetic fields, circuits and thermal effects. This is particularly true with power generation systems where thermal effects significantly affect stability and ultimately power handling capability.


Dr. John W. Bandler, Bandler Corp., Dundas, ON, Canada

Tel: 905-628-9671

Fax: 905-628-1578

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave CAD Using Space Mapping Technology

Abstract: Space mapping optimization intelligently links "coarse" and "fine" models of different complexities, e.g., full-wave electromagnetic simulations and empirical circuit-theory based simulations, to accelerate iterative design optimization of engineering structures. It is a simple CAD methodology which closely follows the traditional experience and intuition of microwave designers. The exploitation of properly managed space mapping models promises significant efficiency in engineering design optimization practices.


Dr. Almudena Suarez, University of Cantabria

Communications Engineering Dept., This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Global Stability Analysis and Stabilization of Power Amplifiers

Abstract: Power amplifiers often exhibit instabilities giving rise to frequency division by two or oscillations at incommensurate frequencies. These phenomena, observed from a certain level of input power, cannot be detected through a small-signal stability analysis of the circuit. Instead, a large-signal stability analysis must be performed. Other behaviors, like hysteresis and chaotic solutions, can also be obtained when the input power is varied. The qualitative changes in the output-power spectrum are due to bifurcations or qualitative stability changes in the circuit solution or in the number of solutions when the parameter is varied. The talk introduces the local and global stability concepts and the analysis techniques, based on harmonic balance. The first objective is to allow a good comprehension of the different phenomena. The second objective is to provide practical simulation tools for an efficient prediction and elimination of the undesired behavior. Different approaches for the local-stability analysis of nonlinear regimes will be presented, with emphasis on the pole-zero identification. Then, techniques will be shown for the detection of the most common types of bifurcations in power amplifiers. The final goal will be the stabilization of the circuit and the design corrections in order to suppress the undesired phenomena will also be presented.

For illustration, the simulation tools will be applied to two different switching amplifiers developed at California Institute of Technology. These amplifiers have remarkably high efficiency, but in intermediate input-power range they exhibited different undesired phenomena. The first amplifier is a Class-E/F amplifier, which showed oscillations, hysteresis and chaos. The second amplifier is a Class-E amplifier, which showed jumps in the power-transfer curve and sideband noise amplification. After the application of the different techniques, the two amplifiers were globally stabilized for all the expected operating values of the amplifier bias voltage and input power. This was achieved with negligible degradation of the amplifier performance, in terms of output power and drain efficiency. The stable behaviour obtained in simulation was experimentally confirmed.


Dr. David Root, Principle Research Scientist, Worldwide Process and Technology Centers

Agilent Technologies, 1400 Fountaingrove Parkway, Santa Rosa, CA 95403, USA

(Phone) +1 (707) 577-4091 ; (FAX) +1 (707) 577-4787, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Nonlinear Analog Behavioral Modeling of Microwave Devices and Circuits

Abstract: This lecture introduces general concepts and specific modern techniques for effective (efficient, general, and accurate) nonlinear behavioral modeling of microwave semiconductor devices and functional circuit blocks. A behavioral model is a simplified but accurate model of a lower-level component that simulates efficiently at the next higher level of abstraction. A distinguishing feature of this presentation is the generation of behavioral models from real large-signal measurements with novel nonlinear vector network analyzer (NVNA) instruments, and also from simulations starting from detailed (complex) circuit models. The emphasis is placed on the combination of nonlinearity and dynamics. Nonlinearity includes harmonic and inter-modulation distortion, clipping, etc. Dynamics includes frequency-dependence and long-term memory effects from a variety of physical origins. In the realm of dynamic nonlinearities, insight from linear analysis cannot always be applied. Superposition is not generally valid, the Fourier domain is less useful, and Green functions don't exist. No fully general or overarching theories of nonlinear dynamical systems exist that are comparable to what exists for linear systems. Nevertheless, great progress has been made recently in nonlinear behavioral modeling. In fact, this lecture suggests we are at the threshold for full interoperability of large-signal measurement systems, modeling approaches, and simulation algorithms for nonlinear hierarchical behavioral modeling. This means we can begin to do for driven nonlinear microwave systems what small-signal S-parameters enable for linear systems.

Modeling techniques in the time domain (phase-space reconstruction and dynamic neural networks), frequency domain (X-parameters), and envelope domain (envelope differential equations and dynamic memory extensions of X-parameters) are presented. The respective models are expressed in the mathematical language native to the simulation techniques that most effectively solve specific classes of problems. These techniques enable modeling and measurements to finally catch up with the simulation techniques of harmonic balance and circuit envelope analysis that have changed the practice of microwave and RF design over the past 25 years.

X-Parameters: the new paradigm for interoperable measurement, modeling, and simulation of nonlinear microwave and RF components

X-parameters are the rigorous supersets of S-parameters that are applicable to linear and nonlinear components alike, and valid under small and large-signal conditions. X-parameters unify linear S-parameters, load-pull (scalar and time-domain) measurements on amplifiers, multi-port nonlinear measurements for frequency translation devices, and advanced calibrated nonlinear waveform measurements in a consistent, rigorous, scalable formalism. X-parameters provide a powerful and eminently practical set of solutions to a wide range of problems and therefore have the potential to revolutionize the characterization, modeling, and design of nonlinear microwave components and systems. X-parameters enable the hierarchical design of chains of nonlinear components under large-signal drive, such as multi-stage power amplifiers, multi-chip RF modules, and RF systems. They can be used to reconstruct the time-domain waveforms (even under very large compression), and estimate nonlinear figures of merit (FOM) such as IP3 and ACPR. With complete IP protection, X-parameters provide the currency of exchange between nonlinear component providers and system integrators, mediating interactions between adjacent levels in the active component hierarchy from the transistor level to RF subsystem. They enable significant design efficiencies by providing high-fidelity accuracy with significant simulation speed-up.

This talk presents the basic concepts of X-parameters, how they are measured by a nonlinear vector network analyzer (NVNA), generated from complicated schematics (detailed models) in circuit simulators, and how they can be immediately used by a new component in simulators for nonlinear design. Several representative examples applying X-parameters to real problems are provided, including independent experimental validation, to demonstrate their utility and value as the methodology of choice for nonlinear RF and microwave applications. Recent extensions of X-parameter measurement, modeling, and simulation technology to long-term dynamic memory identification are also presented.

 



Committee: MTT-2 Microwave Acoustics

Committee Chair(s) Clemens Ruppel, Tel: 43-732-2468-9710, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Robert Weigel, 43-732-2468097, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Dr. Donald C. Malocha, Univ. of Central, FL

Tel: 407-823-2414

Fax: 407-823-5835

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Wireless, Passive Surface Acoustic Wave Tags and Sensors

Abstract:: Surface acoustic wave (SAW) technology can provide wireless, passive RF ID tagging and sensors. There are various embodiments using frequency and time diversity, and coded spread spectrum techniques, to meet different tagging and sensor applications. New research has shown that single frequency and multi-frequency CDMA tags can be used in a wide variety of passive wireless, multi-tag, space and commercial applications. This talk will discuss the current research and technology used for SAW yags and sensors, and describe current tag-sensor technology for space and other applications. The use of coding and spread spectrum techniques will show the advantageous of the technology and contrast to silicon RF tags.


Dr. Clemens Ruppel, EPCOS, Munich Germany

Tel: 49-89-636-53325

Fax: 49-89-63645396

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF Front-Ends for Multi-Mode, Multi-Band Cellular Phones

Abstract: Cellular systems worldwide are reaching maturity, especially the GSM system, accounting for more than 60% of global (cellular) sales in 2004. At its introduction, only the 900 MHz band was used; a few years later, the DCS band at 1.8 GHz was added. In Europe and Asia, these are still the bands occupied. In the U.S., the GSM system gained interest after the PCS band at 1900 MHz became available. Triple-band GSM phones can be considered the first single-system global phones. Today, with the addition of the 850 MHz band in the U.S., the GSM system spans four bands. In response to consumers asking for higher data rates, the GSM system expanded toward General Packet Radio Service (GPRS) and recently to enhanced data rate for GSM evolution (EDGE). Next to the GSM system, the 3-GPP committee has defined the Universal Mobile Telephone System (UMTS) as a global standard able to deliver data rates exceeding the GSM-EDGE standard by a factor of three. Upcoming high-end multi-mode, multi-band cellular phones will provide operation in several WCDMA bands. The bands of operation depend on the regions, as not all nine bands assigned for WCDMA are available all over the world. Thus, advanced cellular phones will operate in two different modes and will cover up to seven different frequency bands. This increased complexity was a driver for the development of integrated RF front-ends, which include ESD protection, switches, SAW and LC filters, and matching networks at least. In some cases power amplifiers (Pas) and duplexers are integrated, too.

Special focus will be on dual mode (GSM and WCDMA) cellular phones with four GSM and three WCDMA bands. On the one hand driven by forward integration � e.g., from PA function via transmitfront-end to a fully-integrated radio on the other hand influenced by new requirements of 3G systems and the integration of complementary access, filtering components such as SAW and BAWfilters have to solve several increased requirements simultaneously. New technologies are required to follow the demand of increased RF performance, reduced PCB area consumption and continuously decreasing component costs.


Prof. Dr. Ken-Ya Hashimoto, Chiba University

Chiba Japan

Tel: 81-043-290-3318

Fax: 81-43-290-3320

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

SiP/SoC Integration of RF SAW/BAW Filters

Abstract: RF filters employing surface or bulk acoustic wave (SAW/BAW0 have been mass produced and widely used in modern mobile communication equipment. Nowadays various analog functions are going to be merged into the baseband chip, and current concern is how you integrate remaining one, namely the RF front end. This is not a simple task because major RF Functional devices are based on non-Si technologies, and the RF section becomes complex rapidly for supporting multi-band and multi mode operation.

This talk discusses research trends of the SAW/BAW filters, focusing on possible integration into RF ICs.

First, modern SAW/BAW technologies are introduced, and it is shown hoe high performances are achievable by the use of current state-of-the-art technologies. Secondly, current front end modules are surveyed, and then it is discussed how they are going to be integrated with active circuit elements.

Finally, System-in-Package (SiP) and System-on-Chip (SoC) technologies are discussed as a possible solution for the full integration of the RF front end including SAW/BAW devices into RF ICs.


Prof. Dr. Leonhard Reindl, IMTEK, University of Freiberg, Germany

Tel: +49-761-203-7220 ; Fax: +49-761-203-7222

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Wireless SAW-Based Sensing and Identification

Abstract: In the recent years unwired SAW sensors and identification tags have come under notice with a growing number of publications and applications. In this presentation the operating principles of wireless passive, mostly SAW-based identification marks and sensors are shown.

The whole radio-based sensor system consists of readout unit, comparable to a RADAR device, and a passive transponder, consisting of a surface acoustic wave (SAW) device wired to an antenna. The surface acoustic wave stores the readout signal for a predefined period of time to suppress all environmental echo interferences. Physical or chemical effects may influence the propagation characteristics of the surface acoustic wave. Two fundamental devices allow storing and modulation of surface acoustic waves: the resonator, and the uniform- or chirped delay line.

In the presentation, the transponder setup using a reflective delay line, resonator, or impedance sensor is discussed in detail, as well as the setup of the readout unit using a pulse of FMCW radar. Special emphasis is set on the achievable accuracy and on the sensitivity range. Several applications of such sensor systems and their state-of-the-art performance are presented by way of examples which include identification marks and wireless measurements of temperature, pressure, torque, acceleration, tire-road friction, magnetic field, and water content of soil. A discussion of other resonant structures which also could be used in a passive transponder system will close the presentation.


Dr. Rich Ruby, Avago Technologies

San Jose, USA, Tel +1-408-435-6497, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

New Technique for Measuring Q and a Comparison of Different Resonator Technologies from MEMs to BAW

Abstract: We present a new method of measuring unloaded Q based on S-Parameter data extracted from resonator measurements that allows one to plot the unloaded Q vs freq. for any resonator. This new way of measuring Q has several advantages as compared to older techniques. There are also several caveats when using this technique, that will be discussed. However, when used correctly, the new Q equation gives insight into Q losses due to parasitic modes, the effect resonator impedance has on Q and most important, a consistent means to compare one resonator technology Q versus another. This technique will be used as a stepping stone to evaluate, MEMs whispering gallery mode resonators, AlN Contour Mode Resonators, QMEMS resonators, SAW resonators, SMR-BAW resonators and FBAR resonators. Various Figures of merit (FOM) will be discussed in the context of each technology.


Dr. Robert Aigner, Triquint

Orlando, USA , Tel: +1-407-598-3039, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

SAW and BAW Technologies for RF Filter Applications: A Review of the Relative Strengths and Weaknesses

Abstract: Acoustic filter technologies based on piezoelectric materials play a key role in wireless communication as they guarantee spectral integrity of RF signals. SAW filters have been used for this purpose since the early days of mobile phones. BAW filters are a relatively recent addition to the technology portfolio. Each technology claims to have unique advantages over the other. This presentation gives a detailed review of the strength and weaknesses for both technologies. The aspects covered include process complexity, unique features, performance parameters and limitations. The application space for RF filters will be mapped out to identify areas where either SAW or BAW dominates or where they compete. Both technologies follow a steep path of improvements which involves introducing new materials, processes and design methods. Rivalry put aside there are many areas where advanced SAW and BAW can benefit from each other.


Takeo Oita , Nihon Dempa Kogyo Co., Ltd.

Tokyo, Japan, Tel: +81-3-5453-6710, Fax: +81-3-5453-6820, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

The Latest Status of RF MEMS, Focusing on the Next Step

Abstract: Expectation of a Cognitive Radio is that it can change its radio functions by swapping software instead of replacing hardware. It is clear that conventional A/D converters with high data rates and large dynamic range will not suffice. Thus, it has been said that RF MEMS is a strong contender as a complimentary technology, allowing More Than Moore to enable the ubiquitous connectivity.

This talk addresses the latest status updated at least once a year of the RF MEMS technology briefly including switches, LC, oscillators/filters using Piezo-materials, Silicon, Metal, and Advanced Quartz MEMS besides focusing on the next step of RF MEMS with the keyword of Tunable, Selectable andCombination




Committee: MTT-3 Microwave Photonics

Committee Chair(s): Dieter Jaeger, Tel: 49-203-379-2341, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Dalma Novak, 410-590-3333, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Charles Cox III, Photonic Systems, Inc.

 

Tel: 781-272-1819

Fax: 781-272-4654

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Techniques and Applications of Analog Optical Links

Abstract: This presentation gives an introductory overview of analog links: direct and external modulation, figures of merit such as gain, noise figure and dynamic range and applications.


Dr. Afshin S. Daryoush, Drexel University

Tel: 215-895-2362

Fax: 215-895-1695

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Fiberoptic Links for Satellite Communications

Abstract: Future generation of communication satellites are based on phased array antennas to generate over 100 simultaneous beams to provide communications services to mobile and fixed terminal users. The feed network operating at Ka-band is a major challenge and optical beam forming networks (OBFN) are considered as a desired technology.


Dr. Tibor Berceli, Professor, Technical University of Budapest

Tel: 36-1-463-4142

Fax: 36-1-463-3289

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Synergy of Optical and Microwave Technologies

Abstract: The lecture presents the combination of optical and microwave technologies offering new and better approaches for many applications. First the optical-microwave interaction principles are treated. That is followed by optical control of microwave circuits, optical-microwave mixing methods, processing of sub-carrier multiplexed optical signals, integration of wireless and optical techniques.


Dr. Chi H. Lee, Univ. of Maryland

Tel: 301-405-3739

Fax: 301-314-9281

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Optoelectric Ultra-Wideband RF/Wireless Communications

Abstract: An optoelectronic ultra-wideband RF/wireless communications system is proposed. We refer this new technology as opto-impulse radio. Impulse modulation is a wireless transmission format for multipath and interference environments. It can provide a jam-resistant, high security, low-power RF communications link. Photoconductive (PC) switches are used as front-end elements in wireless impulse communications systems. Direct sequence code division is used to enhance an ultra-wideband impulse modulation communication system. Experimental results show an aggregate processing gain of 44 dB using a 750 MHz spreading bandwidth.

 



Committee MTT-4: Terahertz Techniques

Committee Chair(s): Peter Siegel, Tel: 818-354-9089, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Koji Mizuno, Tel: 81-22-217-5515, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Peter H. Siegel, JPL, Pasadena, CA

Tel: 818-354-9087

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Terahertz Technology in Outer and Inner Space

Abstract: After more than 30 years of niche applications in the space sciences area, the field of Terahertz Technology is entering a true Renaissance. While major strides continue to be made in sub-millimeter wave astronomy and spectroscopy, the past few years have seen an unprecedented expansion of Terahertz applications, components and instruments. Broad popular interest in this frequency domain has emerged for the first time, spanning applications in diverse as biohazard detection and tumor recognition. Already there are groups around the world who have applied specialized Terahertz techniques to disease diagnostics (1), recognition of protein structural states (2), monitoring of receptor-bindings (3), performing label-free DNA sequencing (4) and visualizing contrast in otherwise uniform tissue (5). A commercial Terahertz imaging system has recently started tests in a hospital environment (1) and high sensitivity imagers with deeper penetration into tissue have begun to emerge (6). Solicitations for more sophisticated instruments and enabling Terahertz components have filtered into US agency proposals from DoD and NASA, to NSF and NIH, and many research groups have sprung up, both in this country and in Europe and Asia. This talk will broadly survey Terahertz technology from its cradle applications in space science and spectroscopy to more recent biomedical and chemical uses.*

----------

* Contact LRW for references and expanded summary by Dr. Siegel

 




Committee MTT-5: Microwave High-Power Techniques

Committee Chair: Kiki Ikossi, Tel: 1-703-960-0261, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Joe Qiu, Tel: 1-310-394-2532, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Allen Katz

Tel: 609-584-8424

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Minimizing Power Amplifier Memory Effects

Abstract: Memory effects are changes in an amplifiers non-linear characteristics resulting from the past history of the input signal. Predistortion linearization depends on a stable non-linear response, and can be significantly degraded by memory effects. This presentation will begin with an overview of linearization techniques and the application of digital signal processing (DSP) to the correction of distortion in power amplifiers. The problems caused by memory effects will be introduced, Different sources of memory effects will be discussed and techniques for their suppression presented.

 

Linearization: Reducing Distortion in Power Amplifiers

Abstract: Our Society's need to exchange greater and greater amounts of information has created an unprecedented demand for highly linear power amplifiers. High linearity is required for the spectrally efficient transmission of information. This presentation will discuss techniques for the cancellation of distortion that are also known as linearization. Different methods of linearization including digital approaches will be introduced and compared. The linearization of solid-state power amplifiers, traveling wave tubes amplifiers and klystron power amplifiers will be considered. Criteria for the evaluation of linearity will be reviewed and special attention given to problems unique to SSPAs.


Dr. James Komiak

Tel: 603-885-6910

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Design and Performance of Microwave and Millimeter-wave High Efficiency Power Amplifiers

Abstract: Device technologies covered include SiBJT, MESFET, HBT, PHEMT, InP, MHEMT, and Wide Bandgap (SiC, GaN) Content includes principles of operation, structures, characteristics, and state of the art benchmarks. Power amplifiers utilizing these device technologies covering L-Band through W-Band are described including state of the art benchmarks.


Dr. F. M. Ghannouchi

Tel: 403-220-5807

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF/DSP Co-Designed Power Amplifiers/Transmitters for Advanced Wireless and Satellite Applications

Abstract: The wireless and satellite communications communities have always been looking for power- and spectrum-efficient amplification systems. The design of such power amplifiers has to be considered closely together with the system architecture in order to ensure optimal system level performances in terms of linearity and power efficiency. This implies the use of adequate transmitter's architectures that convert the analog base band information to architecture dependent amplifier driving signals such as sigma-delta, EE&R, and LINC architectures. This seminar lays out the principles behind the software enabled linear and highly efficient power amplifiers/transmitters sub-systems. Design and practical realization of RF/DSP co-designed transmitters for MC-CDMA and OFDM wireless applications will be presented.

 

Linearization: An Enabling Technology for 3G+ Systems

Abstract: This talk briefly presents the basic concepts of linearization technology as well as the reason why linearization is being considered as an enabling technology for 3G and beyond wireless communication systems, Included will be the description and explanation and how linearization favorably affects both spectrum and power efficiencies of transceivers and what are the devices the system based techniques available to the designer of nonlinear communication circuits and systems. Feedback, feed forward and predistortion based linearization techniques will be presented. Important and critical issues in designing these linearizers will be discussed in light of the broadband communications applications targeted either for handheld or base station terminals. Examples of analog, digital, or hybrid implementations will be presented and discussed.

 



Committee MTT-6: Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Integrated Circuits

Chair: Frank Sullivan, Tel: 978-440-2276, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , John Pierro, Tel: 631-439-9137, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Mohammad Madihian

MEDIWAVE LLC

2 Larkspur Drive

Plainsboro, NJ 08536

Tel: 609-987-1290

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF/Analog Circuit Design for Wireless Communication Networks

Abstract: Demand for wireless terminals with location-free multimedia services has urged development of low-cost low-noise low-distortion small-size front-end modules with switching. RF/IF amplification, synthesizers, and down/up conversion features. The lecture will cover design of amplifier, mixer, switch, oscillator, and frequency-doubler/divider building blocks using the optimum device technology. The lecture will also provide an understanding of S-parameters and their application to the circuit design.


Prof. Shiban K Koul, Indian Institute of Technology

Delhi, India; Tel: +919811209829; Fax:: +91-11-26863165

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it '; document.write( '' ); document.write( addy_text98838 ); document.write( '<\/a>' ); //--> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuit Techniques and Technology

Abstract: Millimeter waves offer widespread applications in defense, space and commercial sectors. In this talk, different technologies for building Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuits and Subsystems will be presented. Starting from conventional microstrip technology, other key technologies including suspended stripline, dielectric integrated guide, finline, LTCC, MEMS, MMIC and polystrata will be described. Design methodology leading to development of several high performance components/ subsystems at 35 GHz, 60 GHz and 140 GHz along with experimental results will be presented. The talk will conclude by giving a comparison of various technologies.

 



Committee MTT-7: Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Solid State Devices

Committee Chair(s): Madhu S. Gupta, Tel: 619-594-7015, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Speaker: Contact Committee Chair

 




Committee MTT-8: Filters and Passive Components

Committee Chair: Sridhar Kanamaluru, Tel: 717-397-2777, Ext 3163, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Ming Yu, Tel: 519-622-2300, Ext 2503, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Chi Wang, Orbital Sciences Corporation

Tel: 703-948-8240

Fax: 703-948-8526

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Analysis and Design of Dielectric Resonators and Filters

Abstract: In 1939 R.D. Richtmyer first presented the concept of dielectric resonators (DRs). In 1960's Harrison and Cohn Presented TE 01+ mode resonator filter and its approximate analysis method. Starting from the properties of the dielectric resonator and Cohn's simple DR model, this presentation will give detailed information including DR's resonant modes and rigorous full wave modeling and design method. Basic types of DR and DR filters are presented. TE01 single-mode filters offer the advantages of design simplicity and flexibility in layout options over HE11 dual mode filters, while dual-mode filter has the significant advantages on the mass and volume of the products. Mixing the TE01 and HE11 modes dielectric loaded cavity in a filter can achieve excellent out of band spurious performance.


Dr. R.V. Snyder, RS Microwave

Tel: 973-492-1207

Fax: 973-492-2471

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Present and Future Filter Design Philosophy: Paradigm Shift in Progress

Abstract: The design of passive filter networks has traditionally been a process in which approximations are made to a desired transfer function using reactive and resistive elements exhibiting the same frequency-dependent functional form. Over the years, a variety of synthesis techniques have been developed that allow for extracting sets of such elements from the transmission and reflection functions associated with approximating the desired transfer function when terminated with a specified source and load impedance. We know that physically it is not difficult to combine lumped, distributed and evanescent elements in the same network. Optimization allows for insertion of elements with different frequency dependencies, but exact synthesis is generally not possible. This presentation will address present approaches and will provide insight into future design approaches.

 

Computing and Enhancing Power Handling in Bandstop Filters

Abstract: Notch filters are increasingly important components in high power communication systems. Cosite interference analog suppression techniques depend heavily on eliminating emission of spurious high power signals at the source, or suppressing such signals prior to a receiver. Understanding and enhancing the ability of notch filters to survive exposure to high RF power is the subject of this presentation. The power handling capability of bandpass and lowpass filters has been studied and much published material is readily available. However, bandstop and highpass filters have not been studied as thoroughly (or public results are not as easy to find). In this presentation, we will present the basic computational basis for determining power handling and suggest methods for increasing the breakdown and/or heat-related failure thresholds.


Prof. Vicente E. Boria-Esbert

Technical University of Valencia

Tel: +34 96 387 9718 (+34 656 357732)

Fax: +34 96 387 7309

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Waveguide Filters for Satellites

Abstract: An overview of all-metal waveguide filters for satellite payloads is offered in this talk. Initially, an historical evolution of this filtering technology, including typical electrical and mechanical requirements, is outlined. Next, recent advancements in full-wave analysis methods and automated design procedures of these filters are reviewed. Then, a Computer-Aided Design (CAD) tool based on such techniques (i.e. FEST3D "Full-Wave Electromagnetic Software Tool for 3D Waveguide Components") is introduced, and its practical application to the analysis and design of several examples of satellite filters is presented. In particular, direct-coupled rectangular waveguide filters, E-plane waveguide technology, dual-mode filtering prototypes and evanescent mode waveguide filters are considered. Classical topologies, as well as more novel configurations for each filter class, are discussed.

 



Committee MTT-9: Digital Signal Processing

Committee Chair(s): Hermann Boss, Tel: 49-894-129-13606, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it Y.K. Chen, Tel: 908-582-7956, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. James B.Y. Tsui, AFRL/SNRP, WPAFB, OH

Tel: 937-255-6127 x 4320

Fax: 937-255-7135

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Digital RF Receivers

Abstract: A recent trend in building RF receivers is to use digital techniques to replace conventional analog approaches, since the digital approach can provide significant advantages. This task addresses the performance requirements of analog-to-digital converters in the receiver system, and several approaches for building wide and narrow band receivers.

 


 

Dr. Jeffrey Pawlan

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Topic-1: Software Defined Radio for Microwave Applications: Explanation, Evolution, Design Details, Your Role in SDR, and Several Live Demonstrations

Abstract:

Part one:

This workshop will begin with an introduction to the principles and the evolution of different SDR implementations. Comparison and contrast to traditional microwave circuits and systems will be shown. The concepts of using quadrature channels and also image rejection will be illustrated with a live demonstration.

Questions and break

Part two:

A live demonstration of an SDR will be shown illustrating both the flexibility and also weak signal reception capability. Several topologies of implementation at microwave will be shown with a discussion of some of their pros and cons. This talk will generate many questions so time will be allotted to answer them and discuss this important topic.

Topic 2: Choosing the best system architecture for tradeoffs in your SDR design

 

Abstract: There are many types of SDR approaches and each one has advantages and disadvantages. Different system requirements such as frequency, tuning range, simultaneous multi-channel capability, dynamic range, sensitivity, power consumption and cost all must be considered when designing a Software Defined Radio. The audience will participate interactively with the speaker to see how a successful design flow is done.



Committee MTT-10: Biological Effects and Medical Applications

Committee Chair(s): Mohammad Tofighi, Tel: +1 215-895-1913 , e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Arye Rosen, Tel: +1 717-948-6112, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Speaker: Dr. Peter Siegel, JPL

Pasadena, CA

Tel: 818-354-9087

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

MTT-10 is Co-Sponsor of DR. Siegel's Talk with MTT-4.

The Abstract is listed under MTT-4.

 



Committee MTT-11: Microwave Measurements

Committee Chair: Kate Remley, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Jan Verspecht or Prof. Andrea Ferrero (both speakers deliver same talk)

J. Verspecht (Point of contact for this topic)

Tel: 32-479-85-59-39

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Andrea Ferrero

Tel: 390115644082

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Non-Linear Measurement: From the Power Meter to the LSNA

Abstract: This presentation covers the most important aspect of Non-Linear microwave device characterization from the early beginning of power meters to the most advance instruments available today like e.g. the Large Signal Network Analyzers. The presentation deals with nonlinear characterization techniques for individual power transistors as well as for communication systems: fundamental and harmonic load-pull measurements, spectral regrowth measurements (ACRP), intermodulation measurements (IM3, IM5, ...), harmonic distortion analysis, error vector magnitude measurements and hot S-parameter techniques. Next to covering the broad topic of nonlinear microwave measurements, the audience will be educated on Large-Signal Network Analyser (LSNA) instruments that can accurately and completely characterize devices under realistic large signal operating conditions.


Dominique Schreurs, KU Leuven

Belgium

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Measurements for Modeling

Abstract: Models aimed for microwave and millimeter wave circuit design are typically based on measurements as opposed to physical simulations. The time needed to acquire the data often takes longer than the model extraction itself. The talk will focus on ways to render the characterization process more efficiently. A distinction is made between measurements for passive components and measurements for active devices and circuits. Issues such as propagation of calibration and de-embedding inaccuracies into model parameter extraction are addressed. By means of various examples, adaptive data collection and excitation design are covered. Finally, the optimal selection of measurements for thorough model validation will be elaborated upon.


Nick Ridler

National Physical Laboratory, UK

Tel: +44 20 8943 7116

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Evaluating Errors and Uncertainties in RF & Microwave Measurements

Abstract: This talk gives an overview of the principles and processes involved in dealing with errors in measurements, particularly at RF and microwave frequencies. The talk shows how the concept of uncertainty can be used to quantify the effects of errors that occur during measurements. The methods used to evaluate and express uncertainty are described and illustrated with some simple practical examples. The purpose of this talk is to enlighten rather than mystify the subject of dealing with error and uncertainty in measurement.


Stavros Iezekiel

University of Cyprus

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Fiber-Optic Links: Design and Measurement Issues

Abstract: Optical fibre is an excellent transmission medium - it has very low loss and very large bandwidth (especially when compared with microwave transmission media). In addition, it is possible to modulate light at several tens of GHz and then recover that modulation. Hence there has been much interest in the use of optical fibre for the transmission and processing of RF signals.

In the first part of the talk, some of the basic design issues for analogue links will be discussed. In particular, the effect of component-to-component interaction on small-signal, large-signal and noise performance will be considered. It will be seen that it is useful to be able to model and measure the "microwave characteristics" of optoelectronic and optical components. In the second part of the talk, various techniques for the measurement of high-speed lightwave components will be outlined. The emphasis will be on extending microwave network analyser techniques to these devices. Issues associated with polarization effects, optical cavity resonances and nonlinearity will be discussed in some detail.

_______________________________________________________________________

Nuno Borges Carvalho

Professor

Instituto de Telecomunicacoes

DETI - Universidade de Aveiro

Campus Universitario

3810-193 Aveiro

Portugal

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

t: +351 234377900

Metrology Developments for Future Wireless Technologies

Abstract: Emerging Wireless Technologies have an impact on nowadays microwave characterization technologies, the change in paradigm from analog to digital and from RF to DC, has a strong impact in the way nonlinear microwave characterization is seen. In this talk a general overview of these technologies is presented, focusing on Software Defined Radio and on RF-DC converters for Wireless Power Transmission, and despite its apparent differences, nonlinear characterization will be presented as an integrated view on how to model and how to characterize those components.

 __________________________________________________________________

Paul J. Tasker

Professor, Cardiff University

Director, Cardiff University and Agilent Technology Centre for High Frequency Engineering

Tel: 44 (0) 29-2087-4423

Fax: 44 (0) 29 2087 4939

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

 RF I-V Waveform Measurement and Engineering - the unifying link between transistor technology, circuit design and system performance

Abstract: Microwave power amplifier performance, output power, conversion efficiency and linearity, etc., is significantly influenced by the terminal voltage and current time varying waveforms that develop at the transistor terminals; terminal waveforms are the unifying theoretical link between transistor technology, circuit design and system performance.  Thus waveform engineering should be a major objective driving the power amplifiers design flow.  However, in practice power amplifier design, while waveform engineering may be a guiding principle, the lack of appropriate RF waveform measurements tools has hindered its direct application at microwave frequencies.  However, the past 10 years has seen the development of a number of RF characterization systems capable of measuring RF voltage and current waveforms.  Coupling such systems with impedance control hardware also enables experimental control (Engineering) of these terminal RF waveforms during measurements; thus providing a practical RF Waveform Measurement & Engineering solution.  This lecture will discuss these emerging systems and show they are now finally enabling practical waveform engineering to be directly undertaken within the power amplifier design flow.  Design support can involve either direct utilization of the measurement system in the design investigation/evaluation loop, or indirect use by providing CAD accessible datasets.

 


 

Committee MTT-12: Microwave and Millimeter-Wave Packaging

//43/ This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

//43/ This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it >

 


Rick Sturdivant

President

Microwave Packaging Technology, Inc.

1275 North Tustin Ave.

Anaheim, CA 92807

Tel: 310-980-3039

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T/R Modules Using 3D and SIP Packaging

Abstract: T/R modules have traditionally used metal housings with glassed-in interconnects and ceramic substrates. More recent approaches use 3D stacked substrates and the tile module approach. This approach resulted in lower cost, lower-profile and lighter-weight arrays. With advances in packaging materials and processes, System In a Package (SIP) approaches are being used for T/R modules. These approaches promise the realization of further cost reductions, large "membrane" arrays for space applications and improved array-level manufacturability. This presentation reviews traditional T/R module packaging, examines a tile module in detail, examines next generation T/R modules using SIP and array-level packaging approaches. The presentation concludes with a projection on future developments in phased arrays.

 

 

Speaker:

Mike Resso

Agilent Technology

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Signal Integrity Characterization Techniques

Abstract: Today’s triple play convergence of voice, video and data have transformed the way communication is done between people, places and time. While high speed internet access is delivered using a combination of optical fiber and digital subscriber line (DLS) technologies to its residential base, there is a huge amount of data streaming over copper. The ubiquitous digital ones and zeros are now propagating at edge rates less than 100 picoseconds throughout high speed routers, switches and base stations, so passive interconnect such as backplanes, cables, connectors and printed circuit boards are exhibiting microwave transmission line effects. The traditional tools of digital design engineers such Time Domain Reflectometry (TDR) oscilloscopes have given way to multi-port vector network analyzers. It is critical that today’s most modern tools are used to characterize and optimize interconnect in an efficient and intuitive manner. Differential s -parameters, multiple aggressor crosstalk, test suites, automatic fixture removal, de-embedding, measurement-based modeling and data integrity are a few of the topics that will be fair game in this presentation. While some theory will be discussed, the majority of time will be spent on how to solve real world problems in a practical environment.

 



 

Committee MTT-13: Microwave Ferrites

Committee Chair(s):Steven Stitzer, Tel: 410-765-7348, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , William Alton, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Charles R. Boyd Jr., Microwave Applications Group,

Santa Maria, CA, 93455

Tel: 805-928-5711

Fax: 805-925-5903

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Ferrite Phase Shifters

Abstract: Review of ferrite materials. Ferrite phase shifter types, characteristics, and selection criteria. Introduction to simple methods for analysis of phase shifter performance. Phase shifter control techniques. System applications in one- and two-dimensional electronically scanning phased-array antennas, circulating and reciprocal switches.

______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Prof. Jozef W. Modelski, Inst. Of Radioelectronics,

Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics

Nowowiejska str., 15/19,00-665 Warsaw, Poland

Tel: 48-22-8253929 or 48-22-8256555

Fax: 48-22-8255248 or 48-22-8256555

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Microwave Ferroelectric and Reconfigurable Antennas

Two types of antennas will be presented: low-cost scan antenna on a ferroelectric substrates and waveguide slot antenna with reconfigurable semiconductor aperture. The ferroelectric scan antenna is based on the first higher order mode on a microstrip line which substrate is made using a ceramic-polymer composite with modified ferroelectric powder Ba0,65Sr0,35Ti03 and an appropriate polymer. The ceramic-polymer composite was designed to change permittivity in response to an applied electric control field for antenna utilization. It allows changing the electrically phase constant of the propagation wave and in turn changes of the main beam direction. The reconfigurable antenna consists of the reconfigurable aperture which is placed on, instead of the narrow wall of a rectangular waveguide. Aperture consist of a number of the reconfigurable elements which are made as the surface PIN diodes (SPIN), and are excited by means of an electromagnetic field existing in a waveguide.



 

Committee MTT-14: Microwave Low-Noise Techniques

Committee Chair(s): Phillip Smith, Tel: 603-885-6785, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Vice Chair: Fabrizio Bonani, Tel: +39 011 564 4140, email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Marian Pospieszalski, Nat. Radio Astr. Lab.

Charlottesville, VA 22901

Tel: 434-296-0350

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Ultra Low Noise, InP Field Effect Transistors Radio Astronomy Receivers: State -of-the - Art

Abstract: Over the last quarter century progress in the noise performance of FET and HFET amplifiers at cryogenic temperatures was quite dramatic. The achievable noise temperatures at particular frequencies were lowered by an order of magnitude and the useful frequency range of cryogenic HFET receivers was extended by about an order of magnitude up to 120 GHz. The presentation will document the course of these developments with special emphasis on the following topics:

 

Noise and signal properties of heterostructure field effect transistors at cryogenic temperatures

Design and examples of realizations of wideband, low-noise, cryogenically-coolable HFET amplifiers in the 3 to 120 GHz range

Examples of realization of receivers for interferometric arrays

Examples of realization of very broadband continuum radiometers

Thoughts on future developments in low-noise amplifier technology and the possible new applications of this technology will be offered. A more detailed summary of this talk is available on request.



Committee MTT-15: Microwave Field Theory

Committee Chair(s): Peter Russer, Tel: 49-89-289-28390, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , David Jackson, Tel: 713-743-4426, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


David R. Jackson, University of Houston

Tel: 713-743-4426

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Leaky Modes and High-Frequency Effects on Microwave Integrated Circuits

Abstract: This presentation will overview the propagation of leaky modes on planar microwave integrated circuit structures, including microstrip line, covered microstrip line, and stripline with an air gap. A leaky mode is a mode that leaks power as it propagates, with the leakage occurring into the modes of the surrounding substrate structure and in some cases also directly into space (for an open structure). The excitation of leaky modes on planar printed-circuit transmission lines leads to signal attenuation due to radiation, crosstalk, and interference effects (since the leaky modes can interfere with the desired mode of propagation). Methods for calculating the properties of these leaky modes will be presented, together with ways of predicting when these effects might occur. For an expanded version of this Abstract please contact Prof. Jackson.


Prof. Peter Russer, Munich University of Technology

Tel: 49-89-289-28391

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Geometrical Concepts in Teaching Electromagnetics

Abstract: This presentation deals with the application of exterior differential forms in teaching electro-magnetics. The formulation of electromagnetic theory can be simplified and the ability to create concepts can be improved by the use of geometrical methods. The exterior differential calculus establishes a direct connection to geometrical images and provides additional physical insight. Exterior differential calculus has simple and concise rules for computation. Furthermore, the objects of differential calculus have a clear geometric significance and the geometrical laws of electro-magneticsassume a simple and elegant form. Contact Prof. Russer for an expanded Abstract.


Prof. Dr. Christopher Caloz;

Ecole Polytechnique de Montreal

Department of Electrical Engineering

2500, ch. de Polytechnique

Montreal (Quebec)

H3T 1J4, Canada

Tel.: +1 (514) 340-4711, ext. 3326

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Metamaterials: Blue-Sky Chimera or Revolution in Microwaves and Photonics

Metamaterials, which are broadly defined as effectively homogeneous electromagnetic structures exhibiting unusual properties � such as negative refraction, sub-wavelength resolution, coupled-mode enhancement, infinite wavelength propagation, zeroth-order resonance, full-space leaky-wave radiation � have drawn huge interest in both the physics and engineering communities since their first experimental demonstration in 2000.

As all novel ideas in science and technology, metamaterials have raised considerable controversies, some believing that they represent a mode topic restricted to academic studies, others seeing in them a revolutionary paradigm for tomorrow's electrodynamics and optics.

This presentation attempts to address the question on the actuel potential of metamaterials in a critical manner and tries to provide a vision of the future directions of research and industrial developments in this field. First, it shows that, in contrast to typical mode topics rediscovering ideas established in the past or borrowing ideas from other fields without scientific grounds, metamaterials are based on some fundamentally novel and useful concepts. Next, it shows a number of practical microwave applications with superior performance and/or functionality compared to prior state-of-the-art microwave engineering solutions. Finally, it discusses the next generation of metamaterials in connection with most recent micro and nanotechnologies.


Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Hoefer

University of Victoria

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

P.O. Box 3055 STN CSC

Victoria, B.C. V8W 3P6, Canada

Tel.: +1 (250) 721-6030, Sec: -8821

E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Multi-Level Modeling for Complex Microwave/High-Speed Design

Complex communication and information systems operating in the Gigahertz range often combine multiple analog and digital functions. The design of such systems must capture all electromagnetic effects and interactions that impact their performance. However, it is impossible to model such systems globally at the field and device levels. Therefore, designers must take a hierarchical approach (top-down design) by which the system is conceived at a high level of abstraction and in behavioral terms. The specifications for its functional components are formulated at the network or circuit level. They, in turn, define a physical structure that requires frequency- or time-domain electromagnetic field analysis. Once the functional components have been realized, their actual physical behavior must be analyzed or measured, including possible parasitic

interactions between them, and abstracted into realistic (as opposed to initially specified) behavioral models that accurately predict their impact on overall system performance (bottom-up verification). This methodology also addresses signal integrity, packaging, interconnects, electromagnetic compatibility (EMC), and thermal issues.

The purpose of this lecture is to familiarize our members with evolving design approaches for systems of large technological and functional complexity, and to demonstrate how microwave modeling and design practices can be integrated into a wider flexible multi-level modeling environment. Techniques for interfacing models at the behavioral, network, circuit and field levels will be demonstrated. They range from order reduction of field models to the coupling of field- and circuit solvers, extraction of equivalent circuits from field solutions and measurements, behavioral representation by neural networks, and the linking of electromagnetic and thermal solvers. The key is to describe different parts of a complex structure by the most appropriate model of lowest possible order, while maintaining a two-way correspondence between functional behavior and physics across the modeling hierarchy.


Prof. Zhizhang (David) Chen

Dalhousie University

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering

1360 Barrington St.

Halifax, Nova Scotia

Canada B3J 2X4

Tel.: +1 (902) 494-6042, Secretary: -3996

E-Mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Web: http://myweb.dal.ca/zdchen/

Unification of Numerical Methods: A General Mathematical Framework for Derivations and New Scheme Developments

Electromagnetic field modeling and simulation have become increasingly popular for accurate designs in modern electrical and electronic engineering, thanks to the drastic advances in computer technology. They have been applied in many areas, in particular in industrial designs where the reduction in the number of design cycles or product's time-to-market has become very critical in a global competitive environment. For instance, in antennas, most of the practical designs are now done with simulations using commercially available software packages before actual prototyping and testing. In high-frequency electronic circuits, due to the fact that analyses based on simple circuit theory are no longer adequate, electromagnetic simulators are increasingly being used to improve design accuracy. In biomedical engineering, numerical simulations are often required to compute dosimetry in a biological body since an actual measurement is either difficult or impossible.

Many numerical methods have been developed so far for electromagnetic modeling and simulation. They present different approaches to the approximate solutions of the electromagnetic field governing equations, namely, Maxwell's equations. They include frequency-domain methods such as the finite-difference frequency-domain (FDFD) method, finite-element (FEM) method and the conventional method of moments (MoM), and the time domain methods such as finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, transmission-line-matrix (TLM) method, time-domain finite-element (TD-FEM) method, and time-domain integral formulations. On one hand, these methods have been proven to be effective in solving electromagnetic structure problems with their respective advantages and disadvantages. On the other hand, they appear to have been derived on different mathematical bases and their solution procedures also appear to be different from each other, presenting challenges and difficulty for students, beginners and even practitioners in understanding and applying them.

This lecture is intended to show otherwise: all the numerical methods can be generalized or derived with the method of the weighted residuals, or method of moments; As the result, an easy way to understand and apply numerical methods is presented and a new perspective on numerical methods and a new way to develop innovative numerical methods are shown. In particular, unifying concepts among numerical methods are described and based on the concepts emerging numerical methods such as meshless, hybrid and multilevel techniques are demonstrated.

 




Committee MTT-16: Microwave Systems

Committee Chair(s): Gregory Lyons, Tel: 781-981-4705, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Reinhard Knoechel, Tel: 49-431-880-6150, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Christopher P. Silva

The Aerospace Corporation

El Segundo, California

Tel: 310-336-7597

Fax: 310-336-0620

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

State-of-the-Art Time-Domain Measurement and Modeling Techniques for Nonlinear Components and Systems

Abstract: This presentation introduces and describes new and highly accurate time-domain measurement and modeling techniques applicable to nonlinear communications components and systems with bandwidths ranging to several GHz. An overview and comparison of time-domain versus frequency-domain measurements as they pertain to nonlinear components and systems will first be given. The development of baseband time-domain measurement techniques and system will next be covered that provides state-of-the-art measurement accuracies of time-domain waveforms critical to design verification, model construction/validation with operational modulated signals, and system troubleshooting. A survey of some common frequency-domain blackbox modeling approaches will then be described, followed by the introduction of a new systematic approach, called the poly-spectral method, that is based on the time-domain input/output measurements involving operational modulated signals. A more detailed summary of this talk is available upon request.


Bruce Kopp

DPM Consulting

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

410-992-4278

Transmit/Receive Modules for Phased Array Antennas

Abstract: Phased array antennas provide a significant improvement in revisit rate in comparison to mechanically rotated antennas. This is of particular importance for RADAR applications, and phased array antennas are typically utilized for high performance RADAR applications of current interest. Transmit/receive (T/R) modules play a significant role in determining the performance, reliability, and cost of a phased array antenna. T/R modules also encompass a diverse set of technologies including semiconductors, packaging, and automated assembly and also present significant technical challenges. This presentation will discuss performance, cost, and reliability challenges associated with T/R modules along with associated emerging technologies.


Reinhard Knoechel

University of Kiel

Technische Fakultat

Germany

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

49-431-880-6150

Microwave Sensors for Industrial Applicattions

Abstract: Microwave sensors find a continuously increasing number of applications for in-line sensing of materials properties and industrial process control. The first part of the talk will focus on the implantation of the latest two-parameter microwave sensors for the rapid determination of material properties. Two classes of two-parameter sensors will be presented. In the second part of the talk multi-parameter sensors will be introduced. With such sensors, dielectric spectra of materials are interrogated over wide frequency ranges at distinct spot frequencies. The most advanced sensors of the latter kind working either in frequency domain or in time domain, and based on ultra-wideband (UWB) bandwidths, will be shown and special applications will be presented.


Arne F. Jacob

Hamburg University of Technology

Hamburg, Germany

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Tel: +49-40-42878-3019

Fax: +49-40-42878-275

Integrated Millimeter-Wave (Sub-) Systems for Future Satellite Communications

Abstract: The advent of Ka-band satellites for broadband mobile communications calls for advanced system architectures, technologies, and designs for both the ground and the satellite segment. In its first part the presentation addresses the particular challenges associated with the realization of compact millimeter-wave terminal antenna systems relying on digital beam forming. The second part deals with the integration and the space qualification of various on-board (sub-)systems using advanced 2.5D (LTCC) packaging technologies.

 

 


 

Prof. Jozef W. Modelski, Inst. Of Radioelectronics,

Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics

Nowowiejska str., 15/19,00-665 Warsaw, Poland

Tel: 48-22-8253929 or 48-22-8256555

Fax: 48-22-8255248 or 48-22-8256555

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Ferroelectric and Reconfigurable Antennas

Two types of antennas will be presented: low-cost scan antenna on a ferroelectric substrates and waveguide slot antenna with reconfigurable semiconductor aperture. The ferroelectric scan antenna is based on the first higher order mode on a microstrip line which substrate is made using a ceramic-polymer composite with modified ferroelectric powder Ba0,65Sr0,35Ti03 and an appropriate polymer. The ceramic-polymer composite was designed to change permittivity in response to an applied electric control field for antenna utilization. It allows changing the electrically phase constant of the propagation wave and in turn changes of the main beam direction. The reconfigurable antenna consists of the reconfigurable aperture which is placed on, instead of the narrow wall of a rectangular waveguide. Aperture consist of a number of the reconfigurable elements which are made as the surface PIN diodes (SPIN), and are excited by means of an electromagnetic field existing in a waveguide.

 


 

 

Committee MTT-17: HF/VHF/UHF Technology

Committee Chair(s): Richard Campbell, Tel: 503-601-1916, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Vice Chair: John Walker, Tel: 44-1455-556565, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Prof. Jozef W. Modelski, Inst. Of Radioelectronics,

Warsaw University of Technology, Institute of Radioelectronics

Nowowiejska str., 15/19,00-665 Warsaw, Poland

Tel: 48-22-8253929 or 48-22-8256555

Fax: 48-22-8255248 or 48-22-8256555

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Microwave Phase Modulators and Shifters

Abstract: This lecture presents an overview of digital and continuous phase modulators and shifters with semiconductor (varactor diodes, pin diodes, FETs) and ferrite elements. Design methods and optimization procedures of different shifter structures for receiving: maximum shifter bandwidth, minimum parasitic amplitude modulation, high efficiency, maximum linearity of phase characteristics (for analog phase shifters) are given, particularly, for varactor diode analog and pin diode digital modulators. Practical realizations in different technologies and in different frequency bands are also presented.

 


 

T. Boles, M/A COM Semiconductor Business Unit

Tel: 781-564-3386

Fax: 781-564-3141

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

A Fully Monolithic HMIC Low Noise Amplifier

Abstract: A two/three stage monolithic silicon low noise amplifier has been designed utilizing SPICE modeling techniques. The circuit design architecture is based on high frequency, small signal BJT's, consisting of a common emitter stage at the input and a Darlington configured pair at the device output.

This paper will also cover the techniques and technology required to fabricate these monolithic high frequency circuits.

 

Design of Darlington Based Silicon MMIC Gain Blocks

Abstract: In many wireless and CATV applications, the use of silicon MMIC gain blocks have replaced discrete devices for low level gain stages and medium power amplification. The gain blocks have become quite cost competitive in volume when compared with the discrete transistors and have the advantage of providing flat power gain while being matched to the required circuit impedances. Design concepts are presented.


Dr. R. Caverly, Villanova University

Tel: 610-519-5660

Fax: 610-519-4436

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF and Microwave Solid-State Control

Abstract: A variety of semiconductor technologies is now available for RF and microwave control. This talk will address such control technologies as PIN diodes and FET-based elements and issues related to the choice of control technology for particular applications. Control design considerations will also be discussed.


Dr. S.C. Cripps, Hywave Associates

Tel: 44-0-1460-234296

Fax: 44-0-1460-234296

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

High Efficiency Amplification of Variable Envelope Signals for Modern Wireless Communications Systems: Doherty and Chireix Re-Visited

Abstract: Modern wireless systems pose severe challenges for the RF PA designer, both at the mobile end, where efficiency is paramount, and at basestation, which may require multi-channel operation. Most systems use phase-shift modulation but usually have accompanying envelope variations in order to limit channel bandwidth. This talk will review the basic theory of the Doherty technique and the Chireix outphasing method for designing such future systems.


Dr. F.H. Raab, Green Mountain Radio Research

Tel: 802-655-9670

Fax: 802-655-9760

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

High-Efficiency RF-Power Amplifiers

Abstract: This talk is an overview of techniques for high-efficiency RF power amplification. First, some basic concepts about transistors and the concept of average efficiency are introduced. The characteristics of conventional amplifiers (classes A, B, and C) are then reviewed. The principles, demonstrated achievements, and practical limitations of RF-power amplifiers operating in class D, class E, and class F are then discussed. The talk concludes with a discussion of techniques for linear amplification using high-level amplitude modulation via a class-S modulator and the Kahn envelope-elimination and restoration technique.

Kahn-Technique Transmitters

Abstract: The Kahn envelope-elimination and restoration (EER) technique allows efficient but nonlinear RF amplifiers to be used to implement a high-efficiency linear transmitter. Fundamentally, a narrowband RF signal is regarded as simultaneous amplitude and phase modulation. The phase-modulated carrier is amplified efficiently by a chain of nonlinear RF amplifiers and the envelope is restored by high-level amplitude modulation of the final amplifier. This talk reviews the concept of average efficiency and then reviews the principles and requirements for the EER technique.

Low-Cost High-Efficiency HF Power Amplifiers

Abstract: Recently marketed "low-cost" RF-power MOSFETs in plastic TO-247 packages are capable of generating significant RF power at high efficiency in single-frequency RF applications. This paper explores the use of these MOSFETs in broadband power amplifiers. PAs operating in classes D, DE, and E are compared.


N.O. Sokal, Design Automation, Inc.

Tel: +1 (617) 641-2388

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Class E Switching-Mode High-Efficiency Power Amplifiers - from RF to Microwave

Abstract: Class E power amplifiers achieve significantly higher efficiency than for conventional Class B or C. Class E operates the transistor as an on/off switch and "shapes the voltage and current waveforms" to prevent simultaneous high voltage and high current in the transistor; that minimizes the power dissipation, especially during the switching transitions. In the published low-order class-E circuit, a transistor performs well at frequencies up to about 70% of its frequency of good class-B operation.

 

Four (4) hour Tutorial Lecture "RF Power Amplifiers, Class A through S - How They Operate, and When to Use Each"

Abstract: With at least ten lettered classes of RF power amplifiers, and several combinations of these classes, many engineers are confused about RF power amplifiers. The complexity of the subject is compounded by the fact that RF power transistor acts either as a high-resistance current source or as a low-resistance switch, or - in some amplifiers - as a high-resistance current source during part of the "on" interval and as a low-resistance switch during another part of the "on" interval (mixed-mode operation). The circuit topology does not define unambiguously the transistor operating mode or the amplifier class of operation.

 




Committee MTT-18: Microwave Superconductivity

Committee Chair(s): Jeffrey Pond, Tel 202-767-2862, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Charles Wilker, Tel: 302-499-5015, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Speaker: Contact Committee Chairs

 




Committee MTT-19: Microwave Technology Business Issues

Committee Chair(s): Ferdo Ivanek, Tel: 650-329-8716, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Mike Golio

Editor-in-chief, IEEE Microwave Magazine

Tel: 480-615-6990

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Engineering Your Retirement

Abstract: Engineering Your Retirement is designed to help technical professionals (engineers and scientists) develop a plan for their safe and successful retirement. The presentation examines important questions such as, "How much money will I need to retire?," "How long will it take for me to accumulate it?," and many others. The audience will be informed of free tools and information needed for someone to answer those questions and to achieve a comfortable retirement on their own schedule. Issues that must be considered to achieve a successful retirement including health care, budgeting, inflation, portfolio requirements, investment allocations, selecting a place to live, mortgage payoff, wills, powers of attorney, etc. are examined.

 



Committee MTT-20: Wireless Communication

Committee Chair(s): Upkar Dhaliwal, Tel: 858-926-5839, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it , Vice-Chair: Edward Niehenke, Tel: 410-796-5866, E-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Dr. Rainee N. Simons, NASA Gleen Research Center Dynacs Group

Tel: 216-433-3462

Fax:216-433-8705

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Recent Advances in Printed Antennas for Wireless and Satellite Communications

Abstract: The talk commences with a brief overview of printed antenna concepts. The overview would include basic types of printed radiators, such as, microstrip patch, strip, and slot antennas. Second, feeding techniques, such as, direct feed, proximity feed and aperture coupled feed will be discussed. Examples of feed systems using microstrip, slotline or coplanar waveguide will be presented. Third, techniques to realize dual polarization and polarization will be presented.

 


Dr. Upkar Dhaliwal, Future Wireless Technologies

Tel: 858-926-5839

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

The Future (and Direction of) Wireless Technologies

Abstract: Everything You Know About Wireless Is About to Change. Everything beyond and around us in old Wired World is undergoing a rapid change in terms of networks, devices/boxes and in terms of technologies. The Talk can be tailored to cover the following topics relating to the evolution of our Wired and Wireless World:

  • Quick Introduction into exiting Radio Uses
  • Quick update of our Radios & Cellular Wireless - 4G
  • Overview of Consumer World - Wireless Electronics Evolution
  • 7 New Worlds of RF-Wireless with the Internet & the Screen
  • Overview of Wireless Connected Power Networks - NIST, DoE
  • Overview of Wireless Health Connected Devices - NIST, NIH
  • Overview of Wireless Connected Smart Transport – IEEE802, DoT
  • Overview of Broadband Wireless Stimulus Plan DoE, NIST, IEEE
  • A Brief look beyond to the Cognitive Radio World as Envisioned for 5G

 


Dr. Jeffrey Pawlan

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Topic 1: Software Defined Radio for Microwave Applications

Explanation, Evolution, Design Details, Your Role in SDR, and Several Live Demonstrations

Abstract:

Part one:

This workshop will begin with an introduction to the principles and the evolution of different SDR implementations. Comparison and contrast to traditional microwave circuits and systems will be shown. The concepts of using quadrature channels and also image rejection will be illustrated with a live demonstration.

Questions and break

Part two:

A live demonstration of an SDR will be shown illustrating both the flexibility and also weak signal reception capability. Several topologies of implementation at microwave will be shown with a discussion of some of their pros and cons. This talk will generate many questions so time will be allotted to answer them and discuss this important topic.

Questions

Topic 2: Choosing the best system architecture for tradeoffs in your SDR design

Abstract:There are many types of SDR approaches and each one has advantages and disadvantages. Different system requirements such as frequency, tuning range, simultaneous multi-channel capability, dynamic range, sensitivity, power consumption and cost all must be considered when designing a Software Defined Radio. The audience will participate interactively with the speaker to see how a successful design flow is done.

 


Committee MTT-21: MEMs

Committee Chair: Pierre Blondy, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ; Vice Chair: John Ebel, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Dr. J. Robert Reid, Antenna Technology Branch, Air Force Research Laboratory

Hanscom AFB, MA 01731

Tel: (781) 377-1077

Fax: (781) 377-1074

email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Three Dimensional Millimeter Wave Circuits

Abstract:: This presentation covers the design and realization of microwave and millimeter-wave circuits using three dimensional metal micro-machining processes. Circuits fabricated using these process have several advantages over competing technologies. One particularly important advantage is the ability to realize TEM transmission lines that operate from DC to over 300 GHz and can be arbitrarily routed on a substrate. These lines are fully enclosed providing high isolation even at millimeter wave frequencies. A second advantage is the ability to accurately reproduce a wide variety of circuits including couplers and filters. Topics covered in this presentation will include the fabrication processes, circuit design and implementation, and the advantages and disadvantages of this new technology.


Dr. Ronald G. Polcawich, US Army Research Laboratory,

Adelphi, MD 20783

Tel: 301-394-1275

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

RF MEMS Devices Using Piezoelectric Thin Films

Abstract: Piezoelectricity is an extremely important physical phenomenon and in ceramic form has been widely used in sensors, actuators, and transducers. Piezoelectric thin film applications have been limited in the past with a majority of efforts emphasizing lower performance materials such as ZnO and AlN because of their ability to be easily integrated with standard microelectronics fabrication. However, a special class of functional materials, ferroelectrics, possesses a tremendous potential in new MEMS devices and has seen increasing research interest in recent years. Of particular interest is the use of lead zirconate titanate (PZT) thin films for actuators. Recently, PZT actuators have been successfully integrated to yield RF MEMS switches capable of operating at less than 10 volts.


N. Scott Barker, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Tel: 434-924-6783

Distributed RF-MEMS Circuits

Abstract: In order to reduce the packaging requirements for RF-MEMS devices we have developed a switched capacitor technology with minimal contact. Although this switched capacitor design results in a reduced capacitance ratio in the range of 5-10 we have also developed circuit designs for phase shifters and tunable matching networks (and the same can be done with filters) which do not require a capacitance ratio over 10. In addition to packaging, another Achilles' heel for RF-MEMS has been the uncertainty in pull-down voltages due to residual stress that is built into the beam during fabrication. We have successfully identified the major contribution of this stress to thin-film gold beams and are now able to routinely fabricate thin-film (< 1 micron thick) gold cantilevers with almost zero tip deflection upon release, and fixed-fixed beams with a pull-down voltage that nearly matches the analytical model without the need for adding on an unknown stress term.


Prof. Shiban K Koul, Indian Institute of Technology

Delhi, India;

Tel: +919811209829;

Fax:: +91-11-26863165

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it '; document.write( '' ); document.write( addy_text40165 ); document.write( '<\/a>' ); //--> This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it or This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Micromachined Microwave and Millimeter Wave Circuit Design

Abstract: Micromachining has been applied to microwave and millimeter wave field to create low loss and high performance passive/active components and antennas. In this talk, starting from Modeling of transmission lines and discontinuities, design procedure to realize passive components will be presented. Next, design, modeling and fabrication of different types of micromachined antennas will be described. Methodology for the design, development and fabrication of RF MEMS switches on GaAs will then be presented. The schemes for developing reconfigurable RF MEMS circuits using either variable capacitors or RF MEMS switches will be discussed. The reconfigurable circuits include: a band pass filter, band stop filter, high isolation switch and a patch antenna.


Prof. Kamran Entesari, Texas A&M University

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it ,

979-845-9586

Noise in RF MEMS Circuits and Tunable Filters

Abstract: RF MEMS switches have become a popular choice for reconfigurable circuits due to their high performance. MEMS switch banks, phase shifters and tunable filters developed over the last decade show promise in realizing miniature reconfigurable radios of tomorrow. However, as devices are scaled to the micro-regime, thermal fluctuations in MEMS structures manifest themselves as phase noise at the output of the MEMS devices and circuits, potentially limiting their performance. This presentation discusses the non-linear effects of Brownian motion on MEMS switches, resonators and tunable filters. Mechanical instabilities in the MEMS structure when operated at high power, makes a MEMS device more vulnerable to phase noise. An insight into the effect of filter parameters on the phase noise of a MEMS tunable filter will also be provided. Non-linear noise analysis in all-pole tunable filters will be discussed in the context of a general approach to model power-dependent noise phenomenon in reconfigurable MEMS filters.


Prof. Dimitrios Peroulis, Purdue University,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

765-494-3491

New Directions in MEMS for RF Front-Ends and Sensors

 

Abstract: RF MEMS switches and varactors are the conventional devices commonly employed to tune the response of a large variety of circuits and antennas. Despite their many advantages, important limitations still exist today in consistently building reliable MEMS structures, high-performance reconfigurable circuits, and robust harsh-environment micro-sensors. The market volume of RF MEMS does not favor multi-billion dollar foundries that are often the norm for CMOS and SiGe technologies. Consequently, process uncertainty becomes a critical issue with few solutions being available today. Such limitations have significantly slowed down the adoption of RF MEMS in commercial products and defense systems. In this seminar we will present new promising methods for addressing many of these challenges. In these methods we seek solutions at the fabrication technology, device, and sub-system levels. As an example, we will present a unique three-dimensional architecture for obtaining base-station quality tunable microwave filters in mobile form factors. These filters simultaneously exhibit a very wide tuning range (>2:1) and a very high quality factor (Q~1,000) at 6 GHz. In addition, they show orders of magnitude improved performance with respect to creep compared to conventional RF MEMS structures. Besides MEMS for RF systems, we will also discuss inherently-reliable harsh-environment MEMS sensors for the health monitoring of aircraft engines. These sensors have demonstrated reliable operation up to 300 degrees C and have successfully identified operating condition changes when attached to ball/roller bearings rotating up to 50,000 rpm. These approaches constitute a paradigm shift on existing RF MEMS practices and provide a path for addressing some of the remaining critical MEMS issues.

 




Committee MTT-22: Signal Generation and Frequency Conversion

Committee Chair(s): Carlos Saavedra, Tel +1 613-533-2807, e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Scott Wetenkamp, 650-948-9283, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it


Speaker: Prof. Carlos Saavedra, Queen's University

Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering,

19 Union Street Kingston,

Ontario Canada K7M 3L3,

Tel: +1 (613) 533-2807,

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Fundamental and Harmonic Mode Self-Oscillating Mixers

Mixers and their local oscillators are often designed in a modular fashion, meaning that, to a large extent, they are designed as isolated blocks that are eventually interconnected together. On the other hand, if the mixer and its local oscillator are viewed as a unified circuit, some new and interesting design paths emerge. The resulting circuits are usually given the name "self-oscillating mixers," or SOM 's for short. While the majority of SOM 's operate in fundamental mode, there are other SOM 's in which a harmonic mode of the oscillator is used for mixing and this can noticeably increase the operating bandwidth of the SOM. The talk will begin with a review of the origin of SOM mixers followed by some of the key highlights in the evolution of these circuits. A recent trend in SOM design has been to use a Gilbert-cell multiplier as the mixing core together various types of signal generation circuits such as LC-tank oscillators and ring oscillators. New work in SOM 's will be presented in which the oscillator network acts as a double-balanced IF load by stacking the oscillator on top of a low-noise mixer core. The resulting SOM has a minimum DSB noise figure of 4.39 dB at 7.8 GHz. Furthermore, a downconverter SOM that can be reconfigured between fundamental mode and harmonic mode operation will be described. This reconfigurable SOM can function in two distinct RF bands. Applications of SOM 's along with their challenges and limitations will be covered. The talk will conclude with a discussion of future trends.

 

 


 

Speaker: Dr. Ajay Kumar Poddar

Synergy Microwave Corp.

Tel: 201-560-3806

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Latest technology and technological challenges in oscillator design

Abstract: The oscillator circuit is, an important and critical module for modern communication system, being traded simultaneously by increase in the operational frequency, improved phase noise performance, wider bandwidth, and decrease in physical dimensions. The resulting physical design layout challenges faced by circuit designers are rapidly increasing in both discrete and MMIC versions of VCOs (voltage controlled oscillators), while the choices for solutions on how these challenges, especially low cost ultra low phase noise solution be best-addressed are kept aside. The phase noise of oscillator circuit used for timing devices is a critical figure-of-merit as it affects dynamic range, selectivity, and sensitivity of a receiver. The ability to achieve optimum phase-noise performance is paramount in most RF design and synthesizers. The continued minimization of phase noise is required for the efficient use of frequency spectrum. The phenomenon of phase noise generation in oscillator circuits has been the main focus of important research efforts, and it is still an open issue despite significant gains in practical experience and modern CAD tools for design. In frequency generating circuits, noise dynamics places stringent condition on the frequency sources owing to inherent high noise-figure and low dynamic-range caused by the uncontrolled nonlinearity at large-signal drive-level conditions. In addition, these problems become critical at high frequency when active devices (Bipolars/FETs) are technologically scaled to obtain higher cut-off frequency.

Unlike other microwave circuits, oscillators do not behave in totally predictable way. Hence “tweaking” has been an accepted mainstay of the signal-source design flow. Fortunately, high-frequency commercial design tools (like Agilent ADS, Ansys, AWR Microwave Office, Cadence Design Systems SpectreRF, Avista Design Systems SP/XL-RF, etc.) have dramatically improved the convergence problem of a nonlinear active circuit (oscillator) under large signal drive conditions. Therefore, tweaking of prototype circuit is far reduced, and designers today can make meaningful sense of the autonomous circuit using powerful CAD tools.

This talk addresses above issues and reports the latest technology and technological challenges in oscillator design for the frequency controlled circuits and timing devices. It also gives the transition from high quality factor expensive discrete resonator (like Crystal, SAW, BAW, MEMS, DR, YIG, Opto-Electronic) based tunable oscillators to low cost monolithic integrated circuit (MMIC) solutions. The solutions that are gaining more popularity such as RF MEMS and Tunable active inductor oscillator (TAIO) are described for completeness, including their CAD simulation and state-of-the-art practical examples in the field of modern electronic and communication systems.

 


 

 

Committee MTT-23: RFIC

Committee Chair(s): Joseph Staudinger, +1 916 434-1710, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 


Speaker: Dr. Waleed Khalil

 

Professor, ECE Department

Ohio State University

1320 Kinnear Road

Columbus, OH 43212-1156

t: +1 614-292-0305

Towards Ultra Wide Tuning Range and Low Phase Noise mm-Wave VCOs: A Negative Capacitance and BiCMOS Perspective

Abstract:

The ever-increasing demand for data rates/range in modern communication/radar systems coupled with the push towards mm-wave links, has dictated the need for wide tuning range voltage controlled oscillators (VCOs). Nowadays, mm-wave circuits have proliferated into many commercialized applications, including next generation WiFi, auto short range radar (SRR), satellite data and video and mm-wave cellular (LMDS). Traditionally, mm-wave VCOs have been implemented in III-V technologies benefiting from fast device speed and low parasitic capacitance. Therefore, VCOs can operate at mm-wave with reasonable tuning range. However, they suffer from the main drawback of high manufacturing cost and limited level of integration. With lower cost, high transistor fT, ease of integration and power-savings, silicon-based VCOs are very attractive for large-volume applications. Unfortunately, the benefits in digital CMOS technology are not perpetuated easily in designing mm-wave VCOs. The RF components, including inductors and capacitors, suffer from low Q-factor. Therefore, large transconductance (gm) transistors are required to compensate for high losses, leading to pronounced capacitive loading effects that sharply reduce the VCO tuning range. Moreover, transistors with large gm generate high switching noise in mm-wave, which significantly degrade the phase noise of the VCO.  In light of these challenges, this talk will present our current research work to build robust Si-based RF circuits with focus on ultra wide tuning-range and low phase noise VCOs.

 




Committee MTT-24: RFID TECHNOLOGIES

Chair: Apostolos Georgiadis

Senior Research Associate
> CTTC,
> Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia (PMT)
> Av. Carl Friedrich Gauss 7
> 08860 - Castelldefels
> Barcelona (Spain)
> Tel: +34 93 645 2900
> Fax: +34 93 645 2901
> Email: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it
> Web: www.cttc.es/en/people/research/person/ageorgiadis.jsp
> Wiki: http://wikics.cttc.es/Apostolos_Georgiadis

 


Manos M. Tentzeris

Professor, School of ECE

Georgia Institute of Technology

Atlanta, GA 30332-250

Phone: 404-385-6006 , FAX : 404-894-0222

Homepage: http://www.ece.gatech.edu/~etentze

Inkjet-Printed Electronics

Abstract: In this talk, inkjet-printed UHF and microwave circuits fabricated on paper substrates are investigated for the first time as an approach that aims for a system-level solution for fast and ultra-low-cost mass production. First, the RF characteristics of the paper substrate are presented by using the microstrip ring resonator in order to characterize the relative permittivity and loss tangent of the substrate at the UHF band for the first time reported. A UHF RFID tag module is then developed with the inkjet-printing technology, proving this approach could function as an enabling technology for much simpler and faster fabrication on/in paper. Simulation and well-agreed measurement results, which show very good agreement, verify a good performance of the tag module. In addition, the possibility of multilayer RF structures on a paper substrate is explored, and a multilayer patch-resonator bandpass filter demonstrates the feasibility of ultra-low-cost 3-D paper-on-paper RF/wireless structures. Various examples of inkjet-printed nanostructures (e.g. CNT's) on paper as well as benchmarking with other flexible materials (e.g., LCP) will conclude the talk.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Apostolos Georgiadis

Centre Tecnològic de Telecomunicacions de Catalunya (CTTC),

Parc Mediterrani de la Tecnologia (PMT), Av. Canal Olímpic s/n,

Castelldefels 08860, Barcelona, Spain

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Web: www.cttc.es/en/people/research/person/ageorgiadis.jsp g

Wiki: http://wikics.cttc.es/Apostolos_Georgiadis

 Tel: +34 93 645 2900 Ext.2180

Cell: +34 667 372079

Autonomous Wireless Sensors and RFID's: Energy harvesting, Material and Circuit Challenges

The presentation begins with an overview of energy considerations and challenges for low power system requirements in emerging applications such as health and smart homes, environmental monitoring, as well as an outlook of various energy harvesting technologies. The state-of-the-art in commonly used energy harvesting technologies such as solar, piezoelectric, thermal and electromagnetic is then presented. Figures of merit are provided and emphasis is placed on design challenges and novel technologies and materials, such as paper, textiles, inkjet printing.

Special focus is placed on hybrid–multiple technology harvesters leading to the development of low profile and conformal solar antennas and solar–electromagnetic harvesters. Design and optimization challenges are provided. Nonlinear circuit optimization combined with electromagnetic analysis is used to optimize circuit performance, and design methodologies for ultra-wideband and multiband RF energy harvesters are presented. Continued interest in electromagnetic energy harvesting is attributed to the minimum additional cost associated with its implementation due to existing antenna modules on wireless sensor nodes and RFIDs, as well as due to the capability for powering of wireless devices by intentional radiation known as wireless power transmission. The latter is addressed and novel system concepts such as transmission of chaotic signals for optimum performance are proposed. Circuit and system examples of autonomous system operation are demonstrated such as wirelessly powered sensors, beacon signal generators, energy harvesting applied to RFID systems. Finally, future perspectives and challenges are discussed in terms of energy storage, materials, and circuit performance and application scenarios.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

Luca Roselli

Strada Ponte Rio – Ponte Pattoli

n. 41/b

Frazione Montelaguardia, 06125

Perugia, Italy

TELEPHONE Univ. +39 075 5853633; Spin-off: +39 075 8298501

FAX +39 075 8298515

E-MAIL This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

“Green RFID”: an enabling technology towards the Internet of Things (IoT) world.

 A brief description of the present and future scenario correlated to ICTs will be illustrated. Environmental implication of present societal and technological trends will be analyzed in order to address the most important and relevant issues. On the basis of this analysis, RFID, as an enabling approach compatible with the described scenario, will be introduced and motivated. Future environmentally friendly technologies and architectures, suitable for “green RFID” implementation, will be introduced, namely: paper printed circuits, organic materials, chip-less tag, harmonic RFID, autarkic sensor nodes, CNT based RFID gas sensors and so on. Some application proposals will be reported in order to illustrate the groundbreaking vision enabled by “green RFID” approach; in particular it will be shown the potentiality of the “green RFID” technologies toward the development of a new concept of indoor localization systems and assisted paths as well as the capability of massive use of green RFID tags for extensive monitoring and for measurements in harsh environments where high numbers of wireless sensors is needed without the possibility to recover them. These example applications will be used to draw final considerations about future developments, challenges and perspectives. It is worth noticing that this topic is, at present, the main one of a book recently committed to myself by Cambridge Press, entitled “Green RFID”, to be published in 2013.

_______________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________________

 

Committee MTT-25: RF Nanotechnology


Prof. Luca Pierantoni

DIBET - Universita Politecnica delle Marche

Via Brecche Bianche , Ancona, Italy

Tel: +39 071 220 4224

Cell: +39 338 714 5118

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Title: Multiphysics Modeling of the Electromagnetic-Transport Problem in Nanodevices: A New Challenge in Computational Engineering

Abstract: The presentation deals with the multiphysics analysis and modeling of the combined electromagnetic-coherent transport problem in new-concept electronics based on nano-structured material and devices. We introduce full-wave techniques both in the frequency (energy)-domain and the time-domain for the investigation of new devices based on carbon materials, namely carbon nanotube (CNT), graphene, graphene nanoribbon (GNR). The quantum transport is described by the Schrödinger equation or its Dirac-like counterpart, for small energies. The electromagnetic field provides sources terms for the quantum transport equations, that, in turns, provide charges and currents for the electromagnetic field. In the frequency-domain, a rigorous Poisson-coherent transport equation system is provided, including electrostatic sources (bias potentials). Interesting results involve new concept-devices, such as multipath/multilayer GNR circuits, where charges are ballistically scattered among different ports under external electrostatic control. Further examples are given by the simulation of cold-cathodes for field emission based on graphene and by the analysis of optical emission/absorption by single or few layer GNR. In the time-domain, we introduce a full-wave approach, in which the Maxwell equations, discretized by the transmission line matrix (TLM) method are self-consistently coupled to the Schrödinger/Dirac equations, discretized by a proper finite-difference time-domain scheme. We show several examples of the electromagnetics/transport dynamics in realistic environments. It is highlighted that the self-generated electromagnetic field may affect the dynamics (group velocity, kinetic energy etc.) of the quantum transport. This is particularly important in the analysis of time transients and in the describing the behavior of high energy carrier bands, as well as the onset of non-linear phenomena due to external impinging electromagnetic fields. We are now working on novel applications, in particular THz carbon-based emitters and detectors, exploiting intriguing mechanisms such as frequency multiplication, semiconductor quantum cascade, optical wave mixing, Bloch oscillation, photoconductive effects.

 

MTT-26: Wireless Energy Transfer and Conversion

Chair: Shigeo Kawasaki, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Jenshan Lin, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Debabni Choudhry, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Speaker: Jenshan Lin, Univ. of Florida

e-mail: This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Title: Wireless Power Transmission: From Far-Field to Near-Field

 

Abstract: Many travelers carrying multiple portable electronic devices share the same frustration of carrying multiple chargers. It would be great if a wireless power station can simultaneously charge many portable devices and the wireless power technology can be widely available like Wi-Fi. While long distance far-field wireless power transmission has been explored for more than a century, the cost, efficiency and safety issue have limited its commercial applications. This talk will review the important developments in the history of wireless power transmission, which predominantly used microwave technologies, and discuss the applications and challenges for commercialization. Near-field wireless charging using magnetic coupling at low RF, on the other hand, is better suited for consumer electronics. In recent years several near-field wireless power systems have been reported. While some of them look like the electric toothbrush that can only charge one device at a fixed position, some have advanced to flexible wireless charging without fixed placement. This talk will discuss the challenges to achieve this flexible wireless charging and show a few examples. The talk will conclude with a comparison between far-field and near-field wireless power transmission, and an outlook for future wireless energy.

 

 

MTT-27 Wireless-Enabled Automotive and Vehicular Applications

Chair: Martin Vossiek This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Vice Chair: Andreas Stelzer This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it .

http://www.lhft.eei.uni-erlangen.de/mtt_27/index.shtml


European Microwave Lecturers

(Jointly sponsored by MTT-S and EuMA)

 

Lecturer

Lecture Title

Lecturer e-mail

Tahsin Akalin Terahertz and Optical Plasmonics: current and future applications This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Ovidio Bucci

Electromagnetic inverse problems: quantifying, qualifying and retrieving the available information.

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Stepan Lucyszyn

An Engineering Approach Towards Creating Ubiquitous THz Applications

  This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it and   This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Eric Rius Design of Planar Ceramic Filters, Microstrip and Substrate Integrated Waveguide Solutions, for Space Applications

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Peter Russer

Network Methods in Electromagnetic Field Computation

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Sergei Tretyakov

Possibilities of Cloaking and Invisibility at Microwaves

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Tahsin Akalin, Assistant Professor at IEMN (Institute of Electronic, Microelectronic and Nanotechnology)

University of Lille 1, France (USTL / IUT-A)

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Terahertz and Optical Plasmonics: current and future applications

This talk is a survey of rapidly developing THz technology in three main applications:

- THz microscopy and imaging,

- THz spectroscopy (including biosensors),

- THz telecommunications.

These applications are possible thanks to the progress on sources, detectors and passive devices. For the sources, quantum cascade lasers (QCL), frequency multipliers and optoelectronic approach like photomixing at 800nm and 1.55µm will be highlighted. For the detectors, special interest is given to Schottky diodes. New promising concepts like recently demonstrated SPASER (Surface Plasmon Amplification by Stimulated Emission of Radiation) will be presented. An important part of this talk is dedicated to THz passive devices with classical but also plasmonic approachs like planar and non-planar antennas, filters, Goubau-Sommerfeld waveguides, and focusing structures. The different combinations of these fundamental bricks (at THz and optical frequencies) allow ambitious applications like recently demonstrated THz nanoscopy and THz imaging (in airport screening lines) which are proofs of the importance of THz technology for civil and security applications.

 

Ovidio Bucci, Professor of Electromagnetic Fields

Faculty of Engineering,

University of Naples Federico II,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Electromagnetic inverse problems: quantifying, qualifying and retrieving the available information.

Abstract: Electromagnetic inverse problems occurs in many branches of applied science, as, f. i., antenna design and diagnostics, non-destructive testing, underground and intra-walls detection, biomedical diagnostics and so on. By their very nature, these problems are usually ill-posed and often non-linear, which makesthe development of effective and reliable inversion algorithms a very hard task. To face this task in a sound way, a necessary prerequisite is to answer the following points:

  • what is the maximum amount of information which can be actually extracted from the (scattered or radiated) field?
  • how can we effectively collect this information?

Only once these question have been answered, we can face the last point:

  • how can we reliably and effectively retrieve an amount of information concerning the radiating or scattering system equivalent to that contained
    in the data?

The lecture is mainly dedicated to answer, under a general setting, the first two points, taking into account the incompleteness and inaccuracy of any real measurement process. However, in the final part, some recent approaches to the last point are presented and open problems and possible pathways are briefly discussed.


Stepan Lucyszyn

Director, Centre for Terahertz Science and Engineering, Imperial College, London

An Engineering Approach Towards Creating Ubiquitous THz Applications

Within the wider terahertz (THz) frequency range (ca. 0.1 to 10 THz), the sub-millimetre wave frequency band (between 0.3 and 3 THz) is still considered to be a largely unexplored part of the electromagnetic spectrum. This ‘THz Gap’, between conventional electronics and photonics, offers the real potential for both scientific and commercial exploitation. However, while the majority of THz groups focus on the former, it is the latter that offers the key to bridge the THz Gap to ubiquitous applications. To this end, new engineering solutions are needed in modelling (mathematical & numerical), design (synthesis & analysis) and fabrications (precision & volume production). As ubiquitous THz applications emerge, the costs of associated passive components, active devices and metrology will fall, creating a positive spiral of growth in all areas; enhancing our modern day living and with the prospect of a huge societal and economic impact.

This lecture will examine the various facets associated with adopting an engineering approach towards creating ubiquitous THz applications. More specifically, for the many engineers currently working at microwave and millimetre-wave frequencies (below ca. 100 GHz), the challenges for working with shorter wavelengths and with more complicated carrier transport and molecular physics will be explained. The lecture will also give, by example, a unique perspective on THz engineering – with conventional approaches and new paradigm shifts – from nano structures, metamaterials and solid-state & vacuum electronics to complete systems level integration, ubiquitous applications and their impact.

 

 

 

Eric Rius

Professor, University of Brest, Science and Technology Faculty, Electronic Department, Information and Communication Science and Technology Laboratory

Design of planar Ceramic filters, Microstrip and Substrate Integrated Waveguide Solutions, for Space Applications


Abstract: High selectivity, low insertion loss, low size and low cost are all essential issues in the design and manufacturing of many microwave circuits and systems. Unfortunately, a simple traditional technology, either planar or non-planar, is unable to provide, at once, all of these characteristics. For a given selectivity, rectangular waveguides present excellent insertion losses and a good flatness, even when high rejections are needed. Unfortunately, they are bulky, and their manufacturing cost is high. Moreover, their integration with microwave planar circuits is uneasy, and such waveguides require transitions from planar to non-planar circuits. Concerning the planar technology, it suffers from poor electrical performances due to its low quality factor. However, planar filters are small, easy to fabricate, cheap, and more compatible than waveguides with traditional integrated-active devices.

A straightforward solution is to combine both solutions in a single structure to benefit from their respective advantages. For this reason, the concept of the substrate-integrated waveguide (SIW) was proposed by K. Wu and D. Deslandes: the waveguide is, in fact, buried into the substrate and delimited by linear arrays of metallized via-holes for the side-wall and by classical planar metallization process for the lower and upper faces throughout the waveguide.

This presentation is dedicated on the design of planar ceramic C-Band filters for a specific space application. Through this example a comparison between microstrip and Substrate Integrated Waveguide solution is made. The advantages of each one are highlighted. Perspectives on the design very compact with high K ceramics will be given and discussed.

 


Peter Russer, Professor, Head of the Institute for High Frequency Engineering

Munich University of Technology,

Arcisstrasse 21,

Munich D-80333, Germany,

This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

Network Methods in Electromagnetic Field Computation

Abstract:Abstract: With increasing bandwidths and data rates of modern electronic circuits and systems, electromagnetic wave phenomena that in the past were in the domain of the microwave engineer, are now becoming pivotal in the design of analog and digital systems. Design, modeling and optimization of high-speed analog and digital electronic circuits and systems, photonic devices and systems, of antenna, radar, imaging and communications systems, among other applications, require the application of advanced tools in computational electromagnetics.

Compared with a network-oriented design a field-oriented design of circuits and systems requires a tremendously higher computational effort. The availability of steadily increasing computing facilities has not reduced the demand for efficient methods of electromagnetic field computation. This is readily understandable especially in the highly competitive design of broadband and high-speed electronic components. The demands for volume, weight and cost reduction foster a compact and complex design of electromagnetic structures yielding a high computational effort in electromagnetic modeling.

Network-oriented methods applied to electromagnetic field problems may contribute significantly to the problem formulation and solution methodology. Whereas in field theory the three-dimensional geometric structure of the electromagnetic field has to be considered, a network model exhibits a plain topological structure. Network models relate integral quantities like voltage and current, which at lower frequencies, can be defined uniquely by line integralsover electric and magnetic field quantities. An essential point is that network models can also apply to electromagnetic structures at higher frequencies when generalized voltages and currents are introduced by a proper definition of integral field quantities. One particular example of thisnprocedure realized in Method of Moments (MoM) where the coefficients of the expansions of electric and magnetic fields can be considered as generalized voltages andcurrents and the linear equations relating these quantities as network equations.

In network theory systematic approaches for circuit analysis are based on the separation of the circuit into the connection circuit and the circuit elements. The connection circuit represents the topological structure of the circuit and contains only interconnects, including ideal transformers. Applying a network description electromagnetic structures can be segmented into substructures. These substructures define the circuit elements and the set of boundary surfaces between the substructures define the interconnection network. Canonical Foster equivalent circuits can represent lossless structures in sub-domains. Canonical Cauer networks can describe radiation modes. The lumped element models can be obtained by analytic methods, i.e. via Green's function or mode matching approaches or by numerical methods techniques (Transmission Line Matrix Method or Transverse Wave Formulation) in connection with system identification techniques.

The network approach allows a systematic introduction of hybrid methods. Furthermore, network formulations are well suited for the application of model order reduction methods. Analytic and numerical methods and examples of their application are discussed. Network methods are applicable in connection with the main analytic and numerical methods for electromagnetic field modeling and provide a large variety of tools for efficient modeling of complex electromagnetic structures.


Sergei Tretyakov, Professor of Radio Engineering

Helsinki University of Technology (TKK)

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Possibilities of Cloaking and Invisibility at Microwaves

Abstract: Recently, the topic of making objects "invisible" for electromagnetic radiation has gained much attention, following new ideas of using engineered electromagnetic materials with unusual properties for this purpose. This lecture provides a comparative review of the recent developments in this field and discusses the potentials of utilizing these ideas for various microwave and antenna applications. The lecture starts from a review of the notions of invisibility and cloaking and their relations to the classical stealth technologies of reducing radar cross section of targets. Next, we make a historical overview of earlier approaches to techniques allowing reduction of scattering from various objects. Recently proposed solutions for cloaking of objects are reviewed and compared, with the emphasis on the fundamental limitations of their performance. This topic is closely linked to the problem of creating of artificial materials with engineered electromagnetic properties. In particular, materials with equal values of relative permittivity and permeability are of interest. The lecture presents our recent developments of such materials based on mixtures of spiral inclusions and their use for cloaking applications. Furthermore, we discuss the use of electrically dense meshes of transmission lines as cloaking devices. It is shown how new cloaking techniques can be used for applications not necessarily related to cloaking of objects, for instance in new microwave lens antennas or in the design of matched absorbing layers.

 

Reimbursement for Speakers Bureau Expenses

Following the talk, the Speaker completes an After-Talk Report, plus an IEEE Expense Form and sends them, together with copies of the Chapter Invitation and MTT-Committee approval, to the TCC Administrator:

Dr. Larry Whicker, Tel: 704-841-1915, This e-mail address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it

 

Following TCC Review/Approval:

- Copies are provided to the ADCOM Treasurer for review/approval.

- After review/approval of the submitted material, the documents are forwarded to the IEEE Financial Office for payment.

(Payment may take up to 2 months.)

Last Updated on 11 March 2014