Follow: Share:Share

Distinguished Microwave Lecturers

The Microwave Theory and Techniques Society, via the Technical Coordinating Committee, each year carefully selects a group of Distinguished Microwave Lecturers who are recognized experts in their fields.

The lecturers are available to present talks to local MTT-S chapters world-wide. MTT-S provides a budget to help defray travel expenses. MTT-S chapters usually cover only local expenses such as meals. Local chapters are invited and strongly encouraged to take full advantage of this unique resource. Speakers give six to seven talks per year so it is prudent to schedule well in advance. Contact the speaker directly to request a talk. If you are unable to reach the speaker directly, please contact DML speaker coordinator and TCC Administrator for assistance.

    • Richard Cameron   (Term: 2013-2015) portrait

      Richard Cameron (Term: 2013-2015)
      View Bio

      Professor (C.Eng., FIEEE, FIET)
      ComDev Europe - Consultant
      11 Lucas Road
      High Wycombe
      Buckinghamshire HP13 6QG
      United Kingdom
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Modern Methods for Microwave Filter Synthesis Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Up until the early 1970s, nearly all filter synthesis techniques were based upon the extraction of electrical elements (lumped capacitors and inductors, transmission line lengths) from the polynomials that represented the filter's electrical performance in mathematical terms. This was perfectly adequate for the technologies and applications that were current at the time, and many important contributions were made to the art of advanced filter transfer and reflection polynomial generation, and then their conversion to electrical component values corresponding to the filter technologies that were then available.


      In the early 1970s a revolution in telecommunication systems and available technology was taking place. The first satellite telecommunication systems were in operation and demand for their services was growing enormously. The crowding of the available spectrum meant that the specifications on channel filters in terms of in-band linearity (group delay, insertion loss) and out-of-band selectivity (high close-to-band rejection, and for transmit filters lowest possible insertion loss), were getting ever more demanding.


      During this period some important advances were made in the art of filter network synthesis. Central to these was the coupling matrix representation of the microwave filter electrical network. The coupling matrix synthesis method offers some important advantages over the classical synthesis methods - one of these is the one-to-one correspondence between the elements of the coupling matrix and the individual physical components of the filter. Another advantage is the ability to reconfigure the coupling matrix through similarity transforms to arrive at a different coupling topology, corresponding to the available coupling elements of the particular microwave structure that has been selected for the application. The coupling matrix will naturally accommodate asymmetric characteristics, and those incorporating special features such as transmission zeros or group delay equalization, or both. All these features are critical for meeting the stringent specifications of today's microwave systems.


      The lecture for the DML tour will focus on the coupling matrix and the many opportunities for advanced microwave filter design that it opens up. Although there are a number of commercial software tools available for the design of such filters, they are often applied without proper understanding of the fundamentals involved or awareness of alternative designs better suited to the specifications in hand, resulting in a device which is sub-optimal in terms of electrical and mechanical performance. The younger upcoming designers tend to rely on these packages, largely due to a scarcity of reference works and journal articles on the subject of modern filter network synthesis methods.


      The DML lecture will aim at bringing these state-of-the-art filter synthesis methods to microwave equipment designers, presenting the possibilities that have now become available for meeting the very stringent specifications that are demanded by modern telecommunication, broadcast, radar and scientific/earth observation satellite systems. The lectures will be presented in a style that minimizes mathematics and jargon as far as possible in order to appeal to multi-discipline audiences.

      Richard Cameron (Term: 2013-2015)
       - Professor (C.Eng., FIEEE, FIET)
      Richard Cameron   (Term: 2013-2015) portrait
      ComDev Europe - Consultant
      Richard Cameron gained his BSc in Electronics with Telecommunications at the University of Loughborough in 1969. He subsequently joined the Marconi Space and Defence Company to begin a career devoted to the design and R&D of microwave equipment and systems for spacecraft and associated ground stations.

       


      In 1975 Professor Cameron joined The European Space Research and Technology Establishment (ESTEC), the technical branch of the European Space Agency (ESA) based in the Netherlands. Here he was involved in the development of software for the design of advanced microwave equipment for space application, particularly microwave filters. He was also responsible for the monitoring of contracts for microwave equipment for telecommunications, radar (earth observation), scientific, TV broadcast and inter-orbit relay spacecraft. In addition he delivered several lecture series on the computer-aided design of microwave filters to national space agencies.


      In 1984 Prof. Cameron joined the ComDev company of Canada to assist in the establishment of the European branch of ComDev - ComDev Europe - based near London, England. This involved laying down the design foundations for the production of passive microwave devices and sub-systems for space application, and later for cellular communication systems. As the company grew, activities tended towards technical management and improving CAD methods for both ComDev in Europe and in Canada.


      Prof. Cameron retired from CDE in 2005, but retained a consultancy role with the Company on an ad hoc basis. Since retirement he has conducted several short lecture series for undergraduate and post-graduate students in Hong Kong and the UK. He has also been appointed a Visiting Professor at the University of Leeds.


      During his career Prof. Cameron has filed 8 patents and has authored or co-authored many papers for technical journals and conferences. He is also the co-author of a technical book, Microwave Filters for Communication Systems - Fundamentals, Design and Applications.

    • Robert H. Caverly (DML Term: 2014-2016) portrait

      Robert H. Caverly (DML Term: 2014-2016)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Villanova University
      800 Lancaster Ave
      Villanova, Pa 19085
      USA
      Phone 1:
      (610)519-5660

      Presentation Abstract Files
      RF Aspects of Magnetic Resonance Imaging Show Abstract / Download

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) scanners are an important diagnostic tool for the medical practitioner.  MRI provides a non-invasive means of imaging soft tissues and to obtain real-time images of the cardiovascular system and other dynamic changes in the human body.  MRI scanners rely heavily on a number of topical areas of interest to Electrical Engineers:  image processing, high speed computing and RF (radio frequency) systems and components.  This presentation will focus on some of the RF aspects of the MR process and MR scanners.  A primer on the physical phenomenon behind magnetic resonance will start the presentation and include a discussion of the origin of the MR signal.  The need for the high static magnetic field (B0), the use of gradient coils for MR signal location, simple RF pulse sequences and how they are used in image construction will be covered.  This MR image construction process and the control of the various steps that manipulate the atomic nuclei to generate the final MR diagnostic image put demanding constraints on RF equipment capabilities and these will be discussed, along with a high-level overview of the various components making up conventional MRI systems.  This high-level overview will include a look at various examples of transmit and receive RF systems and examples of transmit and receive coils that make up MR scanners and system diagrams for both the RF transmit and receive paths.  The talk with then narrow in scope to look at how these RF coils are modeled and controlled in both transmit and receive states and how these components are used for transmit/receive switching and patient and equipment protection.

      Robert H. Caverly (DML Term: 2014-2016)
       - Professor
      Robert H. Caverly (DML Term: 2014-2016) portrait
      Villanova University

      Robert H. Caverly received his Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from The Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MD, in 1983. He received the M.S.E.E and B.S.E.E degrees from the North Carolina State University, Raleigh, in 1978 and 1976, respectively.


       


      Dr. Caverly has been a faculty member at Villanova University in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering since 1997 and is a Full Professor.  Previously, he was a Professor for more than 14 years at the University of Massachusetts Dartmouth (formerly Southeastern Massachusetts University).  In 1990, with support from The National Science Foundation, he was a Visiting Research Fellow with the Microwave Solid-State Group at the University of Leeds in the United Kingdom.  Dr. Caverly's research interests, funded by several government agencies and private industry, are focused on the characterization of semiconductor devices such as PIN diodes and FETs in the microwave and RF control environment.  He has been involved with a number of IMS workshops, including co-organizing workshops in the magnetic resonance area, and has published more than 100 journal and conference papers in these and other technical and educational areas.  He is the author of CMOS RFIC Design Principles from Artech House.   Dr. Caverly has been co-chair of the IEEE Topical Conference on RF/microwave Power Amplifiers (PAWR) twice, in 2012 and 2013.  He is on the editorial board of the IEEE Transactions of Microwave Theory and Techniques and Microwave and Components Letters, an associate editor of the IEEE Microwave Magazine, and past chairperson and current member of MTT-17, the HF-VHF-UHF Technology Technical Committee.  An IEEE Fellow (2013), he is also a recipient of the Dow Outstanding Young Faculty Award from The American Society of Engineering Education and a two-time recipient (2007, 2013) of the Fr. Farrell Service Award from the College of Engineering at Villanova University.  During his career, he has been a consultant for a number of microwave industries working on various microwave control element projects.
    • Goutam Chattopadhyay (DML Term: 2014-2016) portrait

      Goutam Chattopadhyay (DML Term: 2014-2016)
      View Bio

      Jet Propulsion LaboratoryCalifornia Institute of Technology
      M/S 168-314
      4800 Oak Grove Dr
      Pasadena, Ca 91109
      USA
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Terahertz Radar for Stand-Off Through-Clothes Imaging Show Abstract / Download

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: Terahertz Radar for Stand-Off Through-Clothes Imaging
      Goutam Chattopadhyay

      Jet Propulsion laboratory, California Institute of Technology
      M/S 168-314, 4800 Oak Grove Dr
      Pasadena, CA 91109, USA
      goutam@jpl.nasa.gov

      Demand for new surveillance capabilities for usage in airport screenings and battlefield security check-points has led to the development of terahertz imagers and sensors. There are several advantages of imaging at terahertz frequencies compared to microwave or infrared: the wavelengths in this regime are short enough to provide high resolution with modest apertures, yet long enough to penetrate clothing. Moreover, unlike in infrared, the terahertz frequencies are not affected by dust, fog, and rain.
      Several groups around the world are working on the development of terahertz imagers for various applications. One option is to use passive imaging techniques, which were very successful at millimeter-wave frequencies, by scaling in frequencies to terahertz range. However, the background sky is much warmer at terahertz frequencies due to high atmospheric absorption. Since passive imagers detect small differences in temperatures from the radiating object against the sky background, at these frequencies passive imagers do not provide enough scene contrast for short integration times. On the other hand, in an active imager, the object is illuminated with a terahertz source and the resulting reflected/scattered radiation is detected to make an image. However, the glint from the background clutter in an active terahertz imager makes it hard to provide high fidelity images without a fortunate alignment between the imaging system and the target.
      We have developed an ultra wideband radar based terahertz imaging system that addresses many of these issues and produces high resolution through-clothes images at stand-off distances. The system uses a 675 GHz solid-state transmit/receive system in a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW) radar mode working at room temperature. The imager has sub-centimeter range resolution by utilizing a 30 GHz bandwidth. It has comparable cross-range resolution at a 25m stand-off distance with a 1m aperture mirror. A fast rotating small secondary mirror rapidly steers the projected beam over a 50 x 50 cm target at range to produce images at frame rates exceeding 1 Hz.
      In this talk we will explain in detail the design and implementation of the terahertz imaging radar system. We will show how by using a time delay multiplexing of two beams, we achieved a two-pixel imaging system using a single transmit/receive pair. Moreover, we will also show how we improved the signal to noise of the radar system by a factor of 4 by using a novel polarizing wire grid and grating reflector.
      The research described herein was carried out at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California, USA, under contract with National Aeronautics and Space Administration.
      Goutam Chattopadhyay (DML Term: 2014-2016)
      Goutam Chattopadhyay (DML Term: 2014-2016) portrait
      Jet Propulsion Laboratory
      California Institute of Technology

      Goutam Chattopadhyay (S’93-M’99-SM’01-F’11) is a Principal Engineer/Scientist at the NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, and a Visiting Professor at the Division of Physics, Mathematics, and Astronomy at the California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, USA. He received the B.E. degree in electronics and telecommunication engineering from the Bengal Engineering College, Calcutta University, Calcutta, India, in 1987, the M.S. degree in electrical engineering from the University of Virginia, Charlottesville, in 1994, and the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the California Institute of Technology (Caltech), Pasadena, in 1999. From 1987 until 1992, he was a Design Engineer with the Tata Institute of Fundamental Research (TIFR), Pune, India.


       


      His research interests include microwave, millimeter-, and submillimeter- wave heterodyne and direct detector receivers, frequency sources and mixers in the terahertz region, antennas, SIS mixer technology, direct detector bolometer instruments; InP HEMT amplifiers, mixers, and multipliers; high frequency radars, and applications of nanotechnology at terahertz frequencies. He has more than 200 publications in international journals and conferences and holds several patents. Among various awards and honors, he was the recipient of the Best Undergraduate Student Award from the University of Calcutta in 1987, the Jawaharlal Nehru Fellowship Award from the Government of India in 1992, and the IEEE MTT-S Graduate Fellowship Award in 1997. He also received more than 30 NASA technical achievement and new technology invention awards. He is a Fellow of IEEE.

    • J.C. Chiao (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait

      J.C. Chiao (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      University of Texas at Arlington
      416 Yates
      NH538
      Arlington, TX 76019
      USA
      Phone 1:
      817-272-1337

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Implantable Wireless Medical Devices and Systems Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: Radio frequency identification (RFID) has been utilized to increase efficiency and care quality in hospitals for patient information management, drug and equipment inventory, scheduling and staffing. To further improve healthcare, enable new diagnosis and treatment while aiming to reduce costs, major technical challenges still exist. Limited sampling and acquisition of physiological parameters during the interaction period for caregivers and patients provide incomplete information about the patients. Better care with higher diagnosis accuracy can be provided if more and time-lapsed data can be obtained without causing patients discomfort or limiting their mobility. Meanwhile, patient data documentation has become too cumbersome. The lack of portability and timely accessibility of the physiological information prevent real-time management by caregivers and/or patients themselves.

      Wireless technologies bring promising solutions to the aforementioned issues. Low-cost portable wireless electronics have made significant impacts to our societies. Furthermore, recent advances in micro- and nano-technologies provide unique interfacing functionalities to human tissues, and advantages such as miniaturization and low power consumption enabling novel applications in medicine and biological studies. Interfaces between biological objects and electronics allow quantitative measurement and documentation of physiological and biochemical parameters, and even behaviors. The interfaces also provide direct control or modification of cells, tissues, or organs by the electrical circuits making it possible to manage chronic diseases with a closed loop between biological objects and computers. With wireless communication, implantable devices and systems make the interfacing possible for freely behaving animals or patients without constrains, discomfort or limits in mobility. This increases the study or diagnosis accuracy in realistic environments as well as permits remote synthesis of physiological functions and delivery of therapeutic treatment. Furthermore, wireless communication enables networks for ubiquitous access to physiological information at various system levels either within one's body or within a group of patients for better deterministic and statistical understanding of issues in complex systems.

      The lecture focuses on the development of wireless micro devices and systems for clinical and biological applications. The systems are based on technology platforms such as wireless energy transfer for batteryless implants, miniature electrochemical sensors, nanoparticle modified surfaces, microelectromechanical system devices and microwave communication. In this talk, several implantable wireless diagnosis and therapeutic treatment systems will be discussed. An integrated wireless body network for chronic pain management has been demonstrated with wireless closed-loop integration of neurorecorders to recognize pain signals and neurostimulators to inhibit pain. Batteryless endoluminal sensing telemeter architecture has been demonstrated for an esophagus implant for remote diagnosis of gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), an endoscopically-implantable wireless gastro-stimulator for gastroparesis management, and a wireless bladder volume monitoring implant for urinary incontinence management. These applications enable new medicines to improve human welfare and assist better living.
      J.C. Chiao (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      J.C. Chiao (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait
      University of Texas at Arlington
      J.C. Chiao received his Ph.D. degree at California Institute of Technology in 1995, and served as a Research Scientist at Bell Communication Research, Assistant Professor at University of Hawaii, and Product Line Manager and Senior Technology Advisor at Chorum Technologies from 1996 to 2002.

      He joined UTA as an Associate Professor in 2002. He is now a Jenkins Garrett Professor of Electrical Engineering and Joint Biomedical Engineering Program at University of Texas - Arlington; and an Adjunct Associate Professor in the Internal Medicine Department at UT-Southwestern, Medical Center.

      Dr. Chiao is a senior member of IEEE. He has published numerous peer-reviewed papers, edited several proceedings and books, and chaired several international conferences. He obtained five awarded and six pending patents. He received the 2011 O'Donnell Award in Engineering presented by The Academy of Medicine, Engineering and Science of Texas (TAMEST). He also received the 2011 Dallas Fort Worth Metroplex Technology Business Council Tech Titan Technology Innovator Award, and 2011 Lockheed Martin Aeronautics Company Excellence in Engineering Teaching Award. His webpage is at http://www.uta.edu/faculty/jcchiao/
    • Madhu Gupta (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait

      Madhu Gupta (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      Professor
      University of California, San Diego
      Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, University of California, San Diego
      Engineering Building One (EBU1), Room 4235
      9500 Gilman Drive, Mail Code 0407
      La Jolla, CA 92093-0407
      USA
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Microwave Engineering: What is it, where is it headed, and how it serves the mankind Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      This talk is aimed at graduate (and advanced undergraduate) students who are preparing for, or are considering, a career in the field of RF and microwave engineering.  The pre-requisites for appreciating the talk are minimal, and include some familiarity with electromagnetics and radio frequency electronics.


      The talk consists of three components of about equal duration:



      • What is Microwave Engineering: how it is different from low-frequency or optical engineering; what are its theoretical underpinnings; to what applications is microwave engineering put, and what makes microwaves particularly suitable, or even unique, in those applications; why is it necessary to study RF and microwave theory even if all you want to do is "just design circuits".

      • What are the Frontiers of the Field: what is the present state-of-the-art in this field, and the challenges for the future; what technological developments and newer applications are driving the future evolution of the field; what are some of the open research problems; how is the practice of microwave engineering likely to change in coming decades.

      • How does it Contribute to Quality of Life: how microwave engineering meets the human needs of communication, safety and security, decontamination and environmental remediation, health and biomedical applications, agriculture and food treatment; material processing; power generation and transmission; space exploration; material processing; and the generation, transport, and efficient utilization of electrical energy.

      Madhu Gupta (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
       - Professor
      Madhu Gupta (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait
      University of California, San Diego
      Madhu S. Gupta received the Ph.D. degree in Electrical Engineering from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, and is presently both an Adjunct Professor of Electrical & Computer Engineering at University of California, San Diego and the RF Communications Systems Industry Chair Professor at San Diego State University. Along with his other technical interests, his work concerns noise and fluctuations in devices that are active, nonlinear, very small, or used in high-speed/high-frequency applications. Dr. Gupta is an IEEE Fellow; has served as the Editor of IEEE Microwave and Guided Wave Letters and IEEE Microwave Magazine and of three IEEE Press books; has been a conference organizer and Chair of Technical program Committee of IMS2010; and has received the 2008 Distinguished Microwave Educator Award from IEEE Microwave Theory & Techniques Society in addition to a number of awards for outstanding teaching. He also firmly believes that every technical talk should be entertaining, enlightening, and inspiring. Dr. Gupta is presently the President-Elect of the IEEE Microwave Theory & Techniques Society (to become the President in 2013).
    • James Komiak (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait

      James Komiak (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
      View Bio

      Dr.
      New Hampshire
      USA
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Microwave and Millimeter Wave Power Amplifiers: Technology, Applications, Benchmarks, and Future Trends Show Abstract / Download

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: James J. Komiak (M’89-SM’90-F'05) received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 1978. Dissertation research developed the “Real Frequency Technique” for broadband matching an arbitrary load to a resistive generator. He has 35 years experience in system, module, and MMIC design for EW, communication, and radar applications. Currently he is a BAE Systems Global Engineering/Scientific Fellow at the Electronic Systems MicroElectronics Center (MEC) in Nashua, NH. He has over 100 publications and 10 patents. Elected to the grade of IEEE Fellow in 2005 for “Contributions to Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits, High Power Amplifiers, and Transmit/Receive Modules.” Received the Martin Marietta Jefferson Cup Award--"Outstanding Technical Leadership in Development and Demonstration of High Power and High Efficiency Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit Amplifiers and T/R Modules for Phased Array Radar (June 1993)" and his work is represented in the MTT Symposium MMIC Historical Exhibit "World's First Octave Band MMIC with Power Output in Excess of 10 Watts (1989)". Silver Award Winner of the BAE Systems Chairman’s Award for Innovation for “Blue Force Locator & Monitor” (2001) and “Next Generation Power Amplifiers” (2012). Received the BAE Systems Engineering Fellows Leave A Legacy Award (2007). Inducted into the Association of Old Crows Electronic Warfare Hall of Fame in 2008. MTT-S, IMS TPC/TPRC, MTT-5, GaAs IC Symposium (2000 Chairman), former ABET ECE PEV , CEAA.
      James Komiak (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
       - Dr.
      James Komiak (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait

      James J. Komiak (M’89-SM’90-F'05) received a Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering from Cornell University in 1978.  Dissertation research developed the “Real Frequency Technique” for broadband matching an arbitrary load to a resistive generator.  He has 35 years experience in system, module, and MMIC design for EW, communication, and radar applications.  Currently he is a BAE Systems Global Engineering/Scientific Fellow at the Electronic Systems MicroElectronics Center (MEC) in Nashua, NH.  He has over 100 publications and 10 patents.  Elected to the grade of IEEE Fellow in 2005 for “Contributions to Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits, High Power Amplifiers, and Transmit/Receive Modules.”  Received the Martin Marietta Jefferson Cup Award--"Outstanding Technical Leadership in Development and Demonstration of High Power and High Efficiency Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuit Amplifiers and T/R Modules for Phased Array Radar (June 1993)" and his work is represented in the MTT Symposium MMIC Historical Exhibit‑‑"World's First Octave Band MMIC with Power Output in Excess of 10 Watts (1989)".  Silver Award Winner of the BAE Systems Chairman’s Award for Innovation for “Blue Force Locator & Monitor” (2001) and “Next Generation Power Amplifiers” (2012).  Received the BAE Systems Engineering Fellows Leave A Legacy Award (2007).  Inducted into the Association of Old Crows Electronic Warfare Hall of Fame in 2008.  MTT-S, IMS TPC/TPRC, MTT-5, GaAs IC Symposium (2000 Chairman), former ABET ECE PEV , CEAA.

    • Shiban Koul (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait

      Shiban Koul (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
      Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India
      Room No. 320, Block-III
      C.A.RE, IIT Delhi, Hauz Khas
      New Delhi 110016
      India
      Phone 1:
      +91-9811209829

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Circuit to System Level Practical Microwave Education Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: Recent years have seen rapid changes in RF techniques as well as technology. This trend is continuing enabling the use of increasingly higher RF frequencies with their inherent advantages of smaller size components and larger bandwidth. In particular, the use of planar circuit architecture and integration using micro-machining technology has opened up new opportunities in terms of reduction in cost, weight, volume, power consumption as well as extension of operating frequencies. In keeping with the advances in technology, the design approach is also undergoing a rapid change through improved digital signal processing (DSP) techniques and CAD tools. Thus the scope of RF Design Techniques and Technology, that was confined to lower microwave frequency bands (~10 GHz), has expanded to encompass the millimeter wave frequency band (30-300 GHz). This paradigm places new demands on Microwave Education. The responsibility of microwave educators today is to drive students beyond the basic concepts to circuit and system level practical hands-on-education in order to produce highly skilled and motivated wireless engineers who are directly usable to the industry.

      The present talk is focussed to motivate students to opt for career in RF and Microwave Engineering. Starting with the behavior of conventional circuit elements at RF and Microwave frequencies and describing equivalent lumped circuit models of distributed transmission line elements, different technologies available to a designer to built Microwave and Millimeter Wave Integrated Circuits and subsystem will be presented. Starting from conventional microstrip technology, other key technologies including suspended stripline, dielectric integrated guides, fin line, MMIC, RF CMOS and LTCC will be briefly described. Design methodology including use of existing CAD tools leading to development of several high performance components/ subsystems at lower microwave frequencies as well as millimeter wave frequencies centered around 35 GHz, 60 GHz and 140 GHz will be presented. Micromachining has recently been applied to millimeter wave field to create low loss and high performance components and antennas. Methodology for the design, development and fabrication of passive components, antennas and switches at millimeter wave frequencies will be described next. Concept of developing reconfigurable RF circuits using either variable capacitors or switches will then be briefly presented. Future research activities in our group in the area of RF Nanotechnology will also be discussed. In the end, practical demonstration of several pre-fabricated passive and active components at Microwave frequencies will be given using a handheld network analyzer and special custom made test jigs.
      Shiban Koul (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
       - Professor
      Shiban Koul (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait
      Indian Institute of Technology Delhi, India

      Shiban K Koul received the M.Tech and PhD degrees in Microwave Engineering from the Indian Institute of Technology, Delhi, India, where he is currently employed as a full Professor. He is also the Chairman of Astra Microwave Products Limited, Hyderabad, a major company involved in the Development of RF and Microwave systems in India.  His current research interests include: RF MEMS, Device modeling, Microwave and Millimeter wave IC design and Reconfigurable microwave circuits including antennas.


       


      Dr. Koul has successfully completed 24 major sponsored projects, 50 consultancy projects and 35 Technology Development Projects.  He is the author/co-author of 195 Research Papers and 7 state-of-the art books. He holds 6 patents and 6 copyrights. He is a Fellow of the Institution of Electrical and Electronics Engineers, USA (IEEE), Fellow of the Indian National Academy of Engineering (INAE), Fellow of the Institution of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineers (IETE), Member of the Micro and Nano Technology Foundation (MANCEF), USA, Member of the Indian Society of Smart Materials (ISSS), Chief Delegate for world Micro machine Summit from India.  He is the Chief Editor of IETE Journal of Research,  Associate Editor of the International Journal of Microwave and Wireless Technologies, Cambridge University Press, a member of the National Committee for URSI Commissions B, academic expert member on the board of smart materials and research (B-smart) and a member of the national committee of COSPAR-URSI-SCOSTEP. He is on the Editorial boards of the Journal of IETE and the Microwave and Optical Technology Letters, John Wiley, USA.  He had delivered more than 155 invited technical talks at various international symposia and workshops.


       


      Dr. Koul has been a member of the IEEE for the past 30 years. He has served as the Chairman of IEEE ED/MTT Chapter, India Council in (1988, 89, 1992, 93, 94, 95). He has also been a  member of the executive committee of the IEEE Delhi Section and  IEEE ED/MTT Chapter, India Council. He was the past chairman of the Fellow and awards nomination committee of IEEE Delhi Section. Currently, he is the Chairman of Delhi section and also chairman of the Microwave Theory and Techniques Chapter under Delhi section. He is currently a serving ADCOM member and  a Member of IEEE MTT societyâ

    • Earl Mc Cune (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait

      Earl Mc Cune (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
      View Bio

      Doctor
      Besser Associates
      2383 Pruneridge Ave
      Suite 3
      Santa Clara, CA 95050
      USA
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Embrace Circuit Nonlinearity to get Transmitter Linearity and Energy Efficiency Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Wireless communications signals have evolved greatly over the past century, from the use of Morse Code to very complicated digital modulation schemes such as wideband CDMA (WCDMA) and 3GPP Long-term evolution (LTE). This progression challenges the design of transmitters to be simultaneously energy efficient, low distortion, and spectrally clean. The increasing peak-to-average power ratio (PAPR) characteristic of these signals is a particular problem. Because it is important to understand why this is happening this presentation begins with a discussion of the physical implications of Shannon's Capacity Limit combined with the Fourier Transform.


      A 'backwards' design perspective is then presented, where we begin design from a maximally energy efficient circuit (a switch) and then make it generate the required signals instead of the conventional approach of beginning with linear circuitry and then finding ways to improve its energy efficiency. This directly leads to the design and implementation of polar-modulation to improve both the energy efficiency of the power amplifier and linearity of the transmitter. Design of intentionally compressed circuitry is very different from conventional linear amplifier techniques, and these new design techniques will be discussed.


      The presentation will cover the use of both linear amplifiers and switches for the power amplifier module, and the implications of using these approaches on the power supply design, system integration, and performance measures. This presentation will bring the subjects of OFDM, Shannon's theorem, spectral efficiency, and switch-mode amplifiers together in an exposition of polar modulation transmitters that is both entertaining and informative.

      Earl Mc Cune (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
       - Doctor
      Earl Mc Cune (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait
      Besser Associates

      Earl McCune received his BS/EECS degree from UC Berkeley, his MSEE (Radioscience) from Stanford University, and his Ph.D. from UC Davis in 1979, 1983, and 1998 respectively.  He is a serial Silicon Valley entrepreneur, founding two successful start-up companies since 1986: Digital RF Solutions (1986-1991, merged with Proxim) and Tropian (1996 - 2006, acquired by Panasonic).  He is now retired from his position as a Technology Fellow of Panasonic, and is an author, instructor, and independent consultant.  He is currently an instructor for Besser Associates for both Practical Digital Wireless Signals and Frequency Synthesis Principles. He holds 58 issued US patents, and is the author of Practical Digital Wireless Signals (Cambridge 2010).


       


      In his nearly 40 years of experience in the wireless communications industry he has worked in areas including technology development, circuit design, along with systems architecture and integration.  This experience has been gained at NASA, Hewlett Packard, Watkins-Johnson, Cushman Electronics, Digital RF Solutions, Proxim, Tropian, and Panasonic.  The start-up Digital RF Solutions pioneered modulated direct digital synthesis (DDS) technology for very high dynamic range transmitters.  Tropian developed and implemented envelope tracking and polar modulation techniques for highly efficient, multiband and multi-mode linearized power amplifiers.


       


      Dr McCune has presented at ten (10) IMS/MTT workshops since 2000, and has been an invited speaker at RWS, PA Symposium, WAMICON, ISCAS, WCNC, and ISSCC.  He has served on the CICC technical program committee (TPC) since 2000, and also served on the TPC for RWS and the PA Symposium.  He is a regular reviewer for IEEE Journal of Solid State Circuits, Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques, and the Transactions on Circuits and Systems.  He is a Senior Member of the IEEE, and is a member of the MTT, Communications, Solid State Circuits, Vehicular Technology, Aerospace Engineering, and Circuits and Systems Societies.


       

    • Takashi Ohira (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait

      Takashi Ohira (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Toyohashi University of Technology
      1-1 Hibarigaoka
      Tenpakucho
      Toyohashi Aichi 441-8580
      Japan
      Email 1:
      ohira@tut.jp

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Circuit Q factor as a basic but still ambiguous index for resonators and oscillators Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: Everyone agrees that Q factor is a key objective function in designing RF resonators and oscillators. Nevertheless, students, circuit engineers, and even microwave professors often encounter difficulties due to ambiguity in Q factor formulas. There are at least seven possible different ways to define Q factor based upon: 1) fractional 3 dB bandwidth; 2) power dissipation ratio to stored energy; 3) reflection phase to frequency slope; 4) dc power supply pushing figure; 5) output load pulling figure; 6) Leeson's sideband noise spectrum; and 7) Adler's injection locking range. We have to choose the right formula depending on the target of each development. The lecture explores the world of Q factors by giving their physical meanings and schematic examples. The formulas to be shown in the lecture are fundamental and so persuasive that the audience can apply with just a pencil and paper.
      Takashi Ohira (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
       - Professor
      Takashi Ohira (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait
      Toyohashi University of Technology
      Takashi Ohira received the B.E. and D.E. degrees in communication engineering from Osaka University, Osaka, Japan, in 1978 and 1983. In 1983, he joined NTT Electrical Communication Laboratories, Yokosuka, Japan, where he was engaged in research on monolithic integration of microwave semiconductor devices and circuits. He developed GaAs MMIC transponder modules and microwave beamforming networks aboard national multibeam communication satellites, Engineering Test Satellite VI (ETS-VI) and ETS-VIII, at NTT Wireless Systems Laboratories, Yokosuka, Japan. From 1999, he was engaged in research on microwave analog adaptive antennas (ESPAR antenna) and wave-engineered secret key generator devices at ATR Adaptive Communications Research Laboratories, Kyoto, Japan. Concurrently he was a Consulting Engineer for National Space Development Agency (NASDA) ETS-VIII Project in 1999, and an Invited Lecturer for Osaka University from 2000 to 2001. From 2005, he was Director of ATR Wave Engineering Laboratories, Kyoto, Japan. Currently, he is Professor of Toyohashi University of Technology. He is working on unified theory of Q factors in resonators and oscillators. He is also establishing an RF powering technology for running electric vehicles. He coauthored Monolithic Microwave Integrated Circuits (Tokyo: IEICE, 1997). Prof. Ohira was awarded the 1986 IEICE Shinohara Prize, the 1998 APMC Prize, the 2004 IEICE Electronics Society Prize, and the 2012 CEATEC Semi Grand Prix. He served as Chair of APMC International Steering Committee and Chair of URSI Commission C. He serves as Chair of IEICE Microwave Technical Committee. He is an IEEE Fellow. He founded two regional chapters in IEEE MTT Society (Kansai Chapter in 2006 and Nagoya Chapter in 2010). He is an award councilor for European Microwave Association.
    • Jeffrey  Pawlan (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait

      Jeffrey Pawlan (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
      View Bio

      Dr.
      Pawlan Communications
      14908 Sandy LN
      San Jose, CA 95124-4340
      USA
      jpawlan@yahoo.com:
      jpawlan@yahoo.com

      Presentation Abstract Files
      An Introduction to Software Defined Radio for Microwave Engineers Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      This lecture will begin with the definition, history and evolution of Software Defined Radio (SDR). RF/microwave engineers will find it clear and understandable because analogies will be made to conventional classic radio systems and components. The lecture will then introduce the concepts of oversampling and undersampling as it applies to SDR. There will be an introduction to the details of correctly driving and implementing an A/D converter as this is one of the important areas that the RF/microwave engineer will be asked to do. There will be an introduction and explanation of the firmware and software portions of SDR and a comparison with state-of-the art conventional analog circuitry will be shown. A live demonstration of SDR will be presented.


      This lecture will be of strong interest to MTT members as demonstrated in the many workshops and lectures that Jeffrey Pawlan has already been asked to give. Software Defined Radio (SDR) is the culmination of advances on several fronts and probably the most significant area of development in radio systems today. The entire worldwide cellular system uses SDR. NASA and the US military communications are now almost exclusively using SDR. Soon new automobile radios will be SDR to accommodate multiple modulation formats. The role of the RF/microwave engineer in this new technology will be shown so that the audience can adapt and feel that their skills are needed in the evolving field of radio communications.


      This lecture can be tailored to the 1 hour customary meeting lecture time or it can be expanded to be a longer tutorial.

      Jeffrey Pawlan (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
       - Dr.
      Jeffrey  Pawlan (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait
      Pawlan Communications
      Jeffrey Pawlan (M 1989, SM 1996) has been a consultant as owner of Pawlan Communications for 25 years. Prior to that, he had worked for many companies in California in very diverse areas of analog, RF, and microwave design and has been an engineer for 40 years. Some of his work was for NASA projects including the very successful design of the SARSAT/COSPAS search and rescue satellite ground stations. He also taught engineering part-time. Born and raised in the Los Angeles area, he attended UCLA and several other universities. He enjoyed learning many different fields and has 13 years of higher education including a Doctorate degree.

      He has worked on projects for consumer, industrial, and military applications covering a wide range of the spectrum from LF to 50GHz. In addition to his primary involvement with the MTT society, he is also a member of the UFFC (frequency control) concentrating on low phase noise oscillators and phase noise measurements, a member of the AP-S, and also the Communications Society. He has published several papers and has two patents. He is serving as a member on the IEEE SCV Section ExCom and also is on the ExCom of the Central Area, Region 6. He is a member of two MTT technical committees, MTT-9 and MTT-20.

      He has been designing RF and microwave hardware for Software Defined Radio uses within instrumentation and military satellite communications since 1984. For the past nine years he has been concentrating on Software Defined Radio technology with his own radio designs including the development of very capable software and hardware. He has presented talks in a workshop at the 2010 IMS in Anaheim, the 2011 IMS in Baltimore, the 2012 IMS in Montreal, and also at chapter meetings and a short course.

      He was a guest lecturer at the Czech Technical University of Prague in 2010. In 2011 he was a guest lecturer at the University of Aveiro Institute of Telecommunications in Portugal where he presented a one week course on RF design and SDR. In 2012 he was a guest lecturer at the Czech Technical University in Brno. He presented a half-day tutorial on SDR at the WAMICON conference in April 2012.
      pawlan@ieee.org
    • Jose Carlos Esteves Duarte  Pedro (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait

      Jose Carlos Esteves Duarte Pedro (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
      View Bio

      Full Professor
      University of Aveiro
      Instituto de Telecomunicações – Universidade de Aveiro
      3810-193 AVEIRO
      AVEIRO 3810-193
      Portugal
      Phone 1:
      (351) 234 377900

      Fax:
      (351) 234 377901
      Presentation Abstract Files
      The Wonderful World of Nonlinearity: Modeling and Characterization of RF and Microwave Circuits Show Abstract / Download

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Distinguished Microwave Lecture (Proposal)


       


      by Prof. José Carlos Pedro


       


      Title


      The Wonderful World of Nonlinearity: Modeling and Characterization of RF and Microwave Circuits


       


      Abstract


      Despite the many studies that have been undertaken to understand the wonderful world of nonlinearity, most undergraduate electrical engineering programs are still confined to linear analysis and design tools. As a result, the vast majority of microwave designers still cannot profit from the significant technological advancements that have been made in nonlinear circuit simulation, active device modeling and new instrumentation for performance verification. So, they tend to conduct their designs relying on experience, empirical concepts, and many trial and error iterations in the lab.


      This talk will reveal the ubiquitous presence of nonlinearity in all RF and microwave circuits and the recent efforts made to understand, model, predict, and measure its diverse manifestations. We aim to bring microwave engineers’ attention to newly available techniques, and attract researchers to pursue further studies on this scientifically exciting topic.


      Starting with some elementary properties of nonlinear circuits (like nonlinear signal distortion, harmonic generation, frequency conversion and spectral regrowth), we will show that nonlinearity is present in all wireless circuits, either to perform a desired signal operation or as unintentional distortion. In this way, we will show how oscillators, modulators or mixers could not exist without nonlinearity, while power-amplifier designers struggle to get rid of its distortion effects.


      After this theoretical overview, we will introduce some recent advancements in nonlinear microwave circuit analysis tools and illustrate different types of models that are currently being used to represent and predict device, circuit, and system performance. Finally, we will focus the talk on the key metrics that are used to characterize nonlinear behavior, as well as newly developed lab instruments and their ability to assess device performance.


       


       

      Jose Carlos Esteves Duarte Pedro (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
       - Full Professor
      Jose Carlos Esteves Duarte  Pedro (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait
      University of Aveiro

      Prof. Jose Carlos Pedro received the Diploma and PhD Degrees in Electrical Engineering from University of Aveiro - Portugal, in 1985 and 1993, respectively.


      From 1985 to 1993 he was an Assistant Lecturer at University of Aveiro, where he became a Professor in 1993. Currently, he is a Full Professor at the same University, and a Senior Research Scientist at the Telecommunications Institute, where he heads the Wireless Circuits and Systems group.


      As a professor, he has been responsible for several electrical engineering degree courses and undergraduate or graduate students’ projects and he has imparted several invited talks and short-courses in symposia and workshops (e.g. the IEEE MTT-IMS and the European Microwave Conf.) and for several portuguese and foreign companies.


      Among several other administrative responsibilities, he was the Coordinator of the Scientific Council of the Department of Electronics, Telecommunications and Informatics of University of Aveiro and the Department Head from 2007 to 2011.


      His main scientific research interests include the development of computer aided design tools for nonlinear electronic circuits design, telecommunication systems identification, active device modelling and the analysis and design of various nonlinear microwave circuits, in particular, the design of highly linear power amplifiers and mixers.


      He has authored or co-authored more than 150 papers in international journals and symposia and he is the leading author of the book Intermodulation Distortion in Microwave and Wireless Circuits published by Artech House in 2003.


      He has been serving the IEEE MTT-S as member of the Technical Committee 11 on Microwave Measurements and as a reviewer for the MTT Int. Microwave Symposium, the IEEE Trans. on Microwave Theory and Techniques, and as an Associate Editor of that journal from 2005 to 2010. He chaired several sessions in national and international symposia, including the IEEE MTT-IMS and the EuMC, and he was the General Chair of the IEEE technically sponsored INMMIC Workshop of 2006 and the TPC Chair of the IEEE Region 8 EuroCon-2011.


      Prof. Pedro received the Marconi Young Scientist Award in 1993 and the 2000 Institution of Electrical Engineers (IEE), U.K., Measurement Prize.


      In 2007, Prof. José Carlos Pedro was awarded the Fellow grade by the IEEE  for Contributions to Nonlinear Distortion Analysis of Microwave Devices and Circuits.

    • Luca Pierantoni (DML Term 2012 - 2014) portrait

      Luca Pierantoni (DML Term 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      Professor
      UniversitÃ
      UniversitÃ
      Dipartimento di Ingegneria dellÃ
      Via Brecce Bianche 12
      Ancona
      Italy
      Phone 1:
      +39 071 220 4891

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Radio-Frequency Nanoelectronics â Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: <p>In view to the new epochal scenarios that nanotechnologics disclose, nanoelectronics has the potential to introduce a paradigm shift in electronic systems design similar to that of the transition from vacuum tubes to semiconductor devices. Since many nano-scale devices and materials exhibit their most interesting properties at radio-frequencies (RF), nanoelectronics provides an enormous and yet widely undiscovered opportunity for the microwave engineering community.</p>
      <p>The lectures presents a technical overview of some of the main research fields of nanoelectronics for RF applications, i) showing the potentialities offered by emerging nano-scale materials (e.g. carbon nanotubes, graphene), ii) highlighting unprecedented microwave, millimeter-wave and THz devices and systems, iii) focusing on critical technologic aspects.</p>
      <p>While the advancement of research in this area heavily depends on the progress of manufacturing technology, still, the global modeling of multi-physics phenomena at the nanoscale is crucial to its development. Modeling, in turn, provides the appropriate basis for design.</p>
      <p>The aim of this effort is to close the gap between the nanosciences and a new generation of highly integrated and multifunctional devices, circuits, and systems, for a broad range of applications and operating frequencies, up to the optical region. This aim can be achieved by using the panoplia of microwave engineering at our disposal.</p>
      Luca Pierantoni (DML Term 2012 - 2014)
       - Professor
      Luca Pierantoni (DML Term 2012 - 2014) portrait
      UniversitÃ
      Luca Pierantoni was born in Maiolati Spontini, Italy. He received the 'Laurea' degree (summa cum laude) in Electronics Engineering in 1988 and the Ph.D. degree in 1993 in Electromagnetics from the Department of Electronics and Automatics at the University of Ancona, Italy. 

      From 1989 to 1995, he was with the same department, as a Research Fellow. From 1996 to 1999 he worked at the Technical University of Munich, Germany, in the Institute of High-Frequency Engineering as Senior Research Scientist. In 1999 he joined the Department of Electromagnetics at the Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona, Italy as Assistant Professor. In 2002, he has been guest scientist at the Technical University of Munich. Presently, he is with the Department of Information Technology at the Polytechnic University of Marche.


      His current research interests are in the investigation of the combined Maxwell-quantum transport problem in nanomaterials, the analysis of electrodynamics in nanostructures and in the development of computational techniques for the multi-physical modeling of micro- and nano-devices.


      He is a member of the Italian University Network for the Physics of Matter (CNISM), the Italian Institute of Nuclear Physics (INFN), and he is the chair of the IEEE MTT-S "RF Nanotechnology" technical committee.

    • Dominique Schreuers (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait

      Dominique Schreuers (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Katholieke Universiteit LeuvenDiv. ESAT-TELEMIC
      Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
      Div. ESAT-TELEMIC
      Kasteelpark Arenberg 10
      Leuven 3001
      Belgium
      Phone 1:
      +32 16 321821

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Towards Greener Smartphones with Microwave Measurements Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Today's smartphone handsets offer a wide range of functions (phone, GPS, Bluetooth, WiFi, .) to customers, although are still perceived as expensive and energy consuming (requiring a daily recharge). The aim of this talk is to show how microwave measurements impact smartphone design. By optimally engineering the type of measurements made before and after design (linear, nonlinear, loadpull, modulation, .), the efficiency of the design process not only increases, but tougher specifications such as smaller form factor and lower energy consumption can be met more easily. This observation is especially valid in the design of green multi-mode wireless radios, due to the delicate balance between energy efficiency and linearity (that is, cross talk between channels).


      The didactic level of this talk will be adapted to the background of the audience.

      Dominique Schreuers (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
       - Professor
      Dominique Schreuers (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait
      Katholieke Universiteit Leuven
      Div. ESAT-TELEMIC
      Dominique Schreurs received the M.Sc. degree in electronic engineering and Ph.D. degree from the University of Leuven (KU Leuven), Belgium. As post-doc fellow, she was visiting scientist with Agilent Technologies (USA), ETHZ (Switzerland), and the National Institute of Standards and Technology (USA). She is now full professor at KU Leuven. Her main research interests concern the (non)linear characterization and modelling of microwave devices and circuits, as well as (non)linear hybrid and integrated circuit design for telecommunications and biomedical applications.
      Prof. D. Schreurs signed up as IEEE Student Member in 1990, and got elevated to Fellow in Jan. 2012. She has been serving on the IEEE MTT-S AdCom since 2009 in various roles such as Education Chair (2012-2013). Prof. D. Schreurs is presently the Editor-in-Chief of the IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory and Techniques. She is also Distinguished Microwave Lecturer for the term 2012-2014.
      Beyond IEEE, Prof. D. Schreurs also serves on the Executive Committee of the ARFTG organization. She was General Chair of the 2007 and 2012 Spring ARFTG Conferences. In 2002, she was one of the initiators and is now still co-organizer of the successful NVNA Users' Forum, held 3 times/year. She was also co-chair of the European Microwave Conference in 2008 and initiated the IEEE Women in Microwaves event at the European Microwave Week. She is also Associate Editor of the International Journal of Microwave and Wireless Technologies.
      Prof. D. Schreurs is reviewer for all IEEE MTT-S journal publications as well as TPRC member of IMS and RWW. She is also reviewer for many MTT-S (co-)sponsored conferences as well as for other IEEE journals and conferences. She has been regularly session chair at conferences, and acted as judge for student competitions.
      Prof. D. Schreurs is co-editor of four books, contributor to seven books, and (co-)author of over 100 journal papers and 350 contributions at international conferences.
    • Andreas  Stelzer (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait

      Andreas Stelzer (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Johannes Kepler University LinzDepartment RF-Systems
      Altenberger Str. 69
      A-4040 Linz

      Austria
      Presentation Abstract Files
      Integrated Microwave Sensors in SiGe with Antenna in Package: Show Abstract / Download

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Title:


      Integrated Microwave Sensors in SiGe with Antenna in Package:
      From Concepts to Solutions


       


       


      Abstract


      In the last years wireless sensor systems operating in the microwave and mm-wave range became more and more popular. Automotive radar sensors are still the driving force for a higher integration of mm-wave sensors and thus pave the way for applications even in completely new areas. Especially industrial and life-science applications require additional functionality, smaller size, higher accuracy, easier applicability and imaging capabilities, which leads towards flexible multi-channel multi-mode Systems-on-Chip (SoC) and Antenna-in-Package (AiP) solutions, with most RF-parts included.



      The lecture treats various aspects of radar and frontend concepts with respect to integration and begins with basic radar principles (FMCW, Pulse, PRN, OFDM) and realizations like mono-static or bi-static and their integration into a small package.


      The signal evaluation part covers a simple FMCW signal model, extended towards MIMO operation, and concepts for TDMA-, FDMA-, and CDMA-MIMO realizations. Furthermore, a simultaneously transmitting multi-beam sensor combining FDMA transmit phased array with a DBF receiver is introduced. Performance degradations caused by signal imperfections, e.g. due to noise or ramp non-linearity will be analyzed and performance bounds by means of the Crámer Rao Lower Bound stated.


      The integrated basic building blocks VCO, mixer, LNA, PA, realized SiGe-technology, form the core components of various integrated prototype systems. With advances in the packaging technology the handling of mm-wave components becomes much easier; a requirement for most new application areas. The introduced eWLB packaging technology serves as basis for the additional integration of the Antenna-in-Package (AiP).


      With the wide availability of commercial mm-wave chipsets, the antenna as interface to the measurement problem on one hand and the signal processing algorithms on the other hand remain as the main design tasks of the application engineer. Combining the MIMO principle with non-uniform antenna arrangements allows to increase the number of virtual receive antennas. Signal coupling, a major issue in highly integrated devices, generally degrades the performance. In that context a worst-case beam pattern estimation due to statistical errors will be shown.


      The last part of the lecture deals with realized systems of highly integrated SiGe-based sensors covering frequencies from 24 to 160 GHz and applications for 3D-surface monitoring in harsh environments, polarimetric edge detection, as well as low-cost AiP based mm-wave imaging at 160 GHz.


      Andreas Stelzer (DML Term: 2014 - 2016)
       - Professor
      Andreas  Stelzer (DML Term: 2014 - 2016) portrait
      Johannes Kepler University Linz
      Department RF-Systems

      Andreas Stelzer (M’00) was born in Haslach an der Mühl, Austria, in 1968. He received the Dipl.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering from the Technical University of Vienna, Vienna, Austria, in 1994, and the Dr. techn. degree (Ph.D.) in mechatronics (with honors sub auspiciis praesidentis rei publicae) from Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria, in 2000.


      In 2003, he became Associate Professor with the Institute for Communications Engineering and RF Systems, Johannes Kepler University Linz. Since 2008, he has been a key researcher for the Austrian Center of Competence in Mechatronics (ACCM), where he is responsible for numerous industrial projects. Since 2007, he has been head of the Christian Doppler Research Laboratory for Integrated Radar Sensors, and since 2011 he has been full Professor at the Johannes Kepler University, heading the Department for RF-Systems. He has authored or coauthored over 300 journal and conference papers. His research is focused on microwave sensor systems for industrial and automotive applications, radar concepts, SiGe based circuit design currently up to 320 GHz, microwave packaging in eWLB, RF and microwave subsystems, surface acoustic wave (SAW) sensor systems and applications, as well as digital signal processing for sensor signal evaluation.


      Dr. Stelzer is a member of the Austrian ÖVE. He has served as an associate editor for the IEEE MICROWAVE AND WIRELESS COMPONENTS LETTERS. Currently he serves as Co-Chair for MTT-27 Wireless-Enabled Automotive and Vehicular Applications and he was Awards Chair at the EuMW 2013. He was recipient of several awards including the 2008 IEEE Microwave Theory and Techniques Society (IEEE MTT-S) Outstanding Young Engineer Award and the 2011 IEEE Microwave Prize. Furthermore, he was recipient of the 2012 European Conference on Antennas and Propagation (EuCAP) Best Measurement Paper Prize, the 2012 Asia Pacific Conference on Antennas and Propagation (APCAP) Best Paper Award, the 2011 German Microwave Conference (GeMiC) Best Paper Award, as well as the EEEfCOM Innovation Award and the European Microwave Association (EuMA) Radar Prize of the European Radar Conference (EuRAD) 2008. He is a member of the IEEE MTT, IM, and CAS Societies.


       

    • John Wood (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait

      John Wood (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
      View Bio

      Senior Principal Member of the Technical Staff
      Maxim Integrated Products
      120 San Gabriel Drive
      Sunnyvale, CA 94086
      USA
      Phone 1:
      480-577-0927

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Behavioural Modeling & Linearization of RF Power Amplifiers Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      In cellular wireless communications systems, the RF power amplifier (PA) in the transmitter must be as efficient as possible, to minimize energy costs, to prolong battery life, and for 'green' considerations.  Modern spectrally-efficient, digitally-modulated signals such as LTE and UMTS present a challenge for efficient RF PA design, and the power amplifier architectures that are adopted to achieve this goal are generally very nonlinear, and so some form of linearization technique is necessary.


      The increasing use of linearization techniques, and especially the emergence of high speed digital processing as an enabling technology to implement digital pre-distortion (DPD) of the PA input signal, represent an important paradigm shift in PA design. The PA component can now be designed with more emphasis on power and efficiency, without the traditional constraints of meeting stringent linearity specs simultaneously. Understanding the utility of a linearizer to obtain optimum efficiency has thus become a new subject area in modern RF PA design.


      The system-level design of linearized PA transmitters requires accurate models to achieve the optimal performance.  Behavioural modeling is used to describe the PA and linearizer at this level of the design.  In this lecture, we shall present some approaches to the behavioral modeling of nonlinear dynamical systems that can be used to model RF PAs; particular emphasis will be given to the treatment of memory effects. Some common mathematical and systematic approaches to model generation will be presented, to obtain accurate but compact nonlinear dynamical models. A brief description of some characterization techniques will be included.  These same nonlinear modeling techniques can be applied to the design of successful pre-distortion algorithms.  We shall illustrate the overall structure of a linearized transmitter using several DPD architectures, and we shall present various approaches to adaptive pre-distortion, considering such features as convergence, signal bandwidth, accuracy, and cost.

      John Wood (DML Term: 2012 - 2014)
       - Senior Principal Member of the Technical Staff
      John Wood (DML Term: 2012 - 2014) portrait
      Maxim Integrated Products

      John Wood received B.Sc. and Ph.D. degrees in Electrical and Electronic Engineering from the University of Leeds, UK, in 1976 and 1980, respectively.  He is currently Senior Scientist in Maxim Labs at Maxim Integrated Products, Inc, Sunnyvale, CA, where he is working on Envelope Tracking and Digital Pre-Distortion systems for wireless communications applications.  He was formerly a Distinguished Member of the Technical Staff responsible for RF System & Device Modeling in the RF Division of Freescale Semiconductor, Inc, Tempe, AZ, USA.  His areas of expertise include the development of compact device models and behavioural models for RF power transistors and ICs, and linearization and pre-distortion of high-power amplifiers.  To enable and support these modeling requirements, he has been involved in the specification of high power pulsed I-V-RF test systems, for connectorized and on-wafer applications, and in the development of large-signal network analyzer (LSNA), loadpull, and envelope measurement techniques.  From 1997-2005 he worked in the Microwave Technology Center of Agilent Technologies(then Hewlett Packard) in Santa Rosa, CA, USA, where his research work has included the investigation, characterization, and development of large-signal and bias-dependent linear FET models for millimetre-wave applications, and nonlinear behavioural modeling using LSNA measurements and nonlinear system identification techniques.  Between 1983 and 1997 he was a Professor in the Department of Electronics at the University of York, UK, where his research and teaching interests covered semiconductor devices, RF and microwave circuits, IC design, and device modeling.


      He has organized, co-organized, and presented at many workshops at IMS and RWS in recent years; he was on the Steering Committee for IMS 2006, and has been a member of the IMS Technical Program Committee for the past four years, currently Chair of SC-20 'High-Power Amplifiers'. He has been a member of the ARFTG Executive Committee from 2007-10, was the Technical Program Chair for the 70th & 75th ARFTG Conferences (2007, 2010), and the General Chair for the 78th ARFTG Conference in Fall 2011.  He was Technical Program Chair for the IEEE Power Amplifier Symposium 2008, 2010, and was General Chair in 2009 and 2011. He is a regular reviewer for IEEE Transactions on Microwave Theory & Techniques, on Electron Devices, and on Circuits & Systems. He is author or co-author of over 120 papers and articles in the fields of microwave device and system modeling and characterization, and microwave device technology.  He is the co-author of Modeling and Characterization of RF and Microwave Power FETs (Cambridge, 2007), and co-editor of Fundamentals of Nonlinear Behavioral Modeling for RF and Microwave Design (Artech House, 2005). He received the ARFTG Technology Award in 2007.  He is a Fellow of the IEEE, and a member of the Microwave Theory and Techniques, and Electron Devices Societies.

    • Jianpang  Yao (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait

      Jianpang Yao (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
      View Bio

      Professor
      University of OttawaSchool of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science
      800 King Edward Ave
      Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5
      Canada
      Phone 1:
      +1 613-562-5800 X-6309

      Presentation Abstract Files
      Microwave Photonics Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract:

      Microwave photonics is an area that studies the interaction between microwave and optical waves for the generation, distribution, control and processing of microwave signals by means of photonics. There are numerous applications of microwave photonics, such as optically controlled phased array antennas, fiber-fed wireless communication systems, radar, sensors, warfare systems, and instrumentation. In this lecture, an introduction to microwave photonics will be presented, then different topics of microwave photonics will be discussed, including



      • Photonic true time beamforming

      • Photonic processing of microwave signals,

      • Photonic generation of microwave signals and arbitrary microwave waveforms

      • Radio over fiber and UWB over fiber

      • Photonic-assisted instantaneous microwave frequency measurement

      • Photonic analog-to-digital conversion


      Challenges in implementing microwave photonics system and future research directions will also be discussed.

      Jianpang Yao (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
       - Professor
      Jianpang  Yao (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait
      University of Ottawa
      School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

      Jianping Yao received the Ph.D. degree in electrical engineering from the Université de Toulon, France, in December 1997. He joined the School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada, as an Assistant Professor in 2001, where he became an Associate Professor in 2003, a Full Professor in 2006. He was appointed University Research Chair in Microwave Photonics in 2007. From July 2007 to June 2010, he was Director of the Ottawa-Carleton Institute for Electrical and Computer Engineering. Prior to joining the University of Ottawa, he was an Assistant Professor in the School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Nanyang Technological University, Singapore, from 1999 to 2011.


       


      Dr. Yao has published more than 380 papers, including more than 210 papers in peer-reviewed journals and 170 papers in conference proceedings. He is a Chair of numerous international conferences, symposia, and workshops, including the Vice-TPC Chair of the 2007 IEEE Microwave Photonics Conference, TPC Co-Chair of the 2009 and 2010 Asia-Pacific Microwave Photonics Conferences, TPC Chair of the high-speed and broadband wireless technologies subcommittee of the 2009-2012 IEEE Radio Wireless Symposia, TPC Chair of the microwave photonics subcommittee of the 2009 IEEE Photonics Society Annual Meeting, TPC Chair of the 2010 IEEE Microwave Photonics Conference, and General Co-Chair of the 2011 IEEE Microwave Photonics Conference. Dr. Yao received the 2005 International Creative Research Award at the University of Ottawa. He was the recipient of the 2007 George S. Glinski Award for Excellence in Research. Dr. Yao was selected to receive an inaugural OSA outstanding reviewer award in 2012.


       


      Dr. Yao is a registered Professional Engineer of Ontario. He is a Fellow of the IEEE, a Fellow of the Optical Society of America, and a Fellow of the Canadian Academy of Engineering.


       


       

    • Thomas Zwick  (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait

      Thomas Zwick (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
      View Bio

      Professor
      Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
      Karlsruhe Institute of Technology
      Kaiserstr. 12
      Karlsruhe Baden-Wuerttemberg 76128
      Germany
      Presentation Abstract Files
      QFN-based Packaging Concepts for Millimeter Wave Transceivers Show Abstract

      Presentations are available for IEEE MTT members exclusively.

      Join IEEE MTT

      Members please sign-in

      Abstract: During the last years the speed and also the level of integration of monolithic microwave integrated circuits (MMICs) increased drastically. Today's circuits are able to operate at frequencies up to the sub-millimeter-wave range (= 300 GHz) and combine highly sophisticated systems within one single chip (System on Chip, SoC). These chips have to be encapsulated in packages or modules to make their features available for the clients. Due to the fact that most of those systems require RF interconnections for external antennas or succeeding systems their packages have to fulfill very high requirements at machining and alignment as well as the used packaging materials. For frequencies beyond 100 GHz this normally involves high-quality but expensive and bulky waveguides and machined metal housings. RF modules out of metal offer a very high quality but are very expensive and result in a low level of integration. Due to the huge efforts for the creation of the packages, the price for a module is no longer limited by the inserted MMICs but by the packaging costs. To address a mass market for MMICs operating in the high millimeter-wave range such metal modules are not feasible and have to be replaced by cheaper packaging materials, which, however, come with a couple of additional problems. The plastic packaging materials are quite lossy and the RF interconnection of such a package is limited due to the lead and wire-bond inductances of approximately 1 nH/mm, which prohibit a frequency above 20 GHz.&lt;br /&gt;This presentation introduces the idea of a low-cost fully integrated surface-mountable millimeter-wave radar sensor. Different packaging topologies are compared with the potential of integrating the whole radar frontend together with the antennas into a single QFN (Quad-Flat-No-Lead) package. If no high frequency RF interconnect on/off the package is necessary the standard plastic packages come with another advantage, which is their usability within low-cost Surface Mount Technologies (SMTs). A highly complex system in package (SiP) can be picked and placed and finally soldered automatically onto the surface of a printed circuit board (PCB). This however makes it necessary to integrate the antenna together with the MMIC into a single package. In that case only DC and baseband signals have to be conducted through the package-to-board interconnections and thus the requirements for these interconnections are greatly relaxed. Different options how a fully integrated millimeter-wave system can be realized within a surface mountable package will be presented with measurements and different concepts for a low cost surface mountable 120GHz radar sensor in a QFN package will be compared.
      Thomas Zwick (DML Term: 2013 - 2015)
       - Professor
      Thomas Zwick  (DML Term: 2013 - 2015) portrait
      Karlsruhe Institute of Technology

      Thomas Zwick (S'95-M'00-SM'06) received the Dipl.-Ing. (M.S.E.E.) and the Dr.-Ing. (Ph.D.E.E.) degrees from the Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Germany in 1994 and 1999, respectively. From 1994 to 2001 he was research assistant at the Institut für Höchstfrequenztechnik und Elektronik (IHE) at the Universität Karlsruhe (TH), Germany. February 2001 he joined IBM as research staff member at the IBM T. J. Watson Research Center in Yorktown Heights, NY, USA. From October 2004 to September 2007 T. Zwick was with Siemens AG, Lindau, Germany. During this period he managed the RF development team for automotive radars. In October 2007 he became appointed as full professor at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Germany. T. Zwick is director of the Institut für Hochfrequenztechnik und Elektronik at the KIT.


       


      His research topics include wave propagation, stochastic channel modeling, channel measurement techniques, material measurements, microwave techniques, millimeter wave antenna design, wireless communication and radar system design. He participated as an expert in the European COST231 Evolution of Land Mobile Radio (Including Personal) Communications and COST259 Wireless Flexible Personalized Communications. For the Carl Cranz Series for Scientific Education he served as a lecturer for Wave Propagation. He received the best paper award on the International Symposium on Spread Spectrum Technology and Applications, ISSSTA 1998. In 2005 he received the Lewis award for outstanding paper at the IEEE International Solid State Circuits Conference. Since 2008 he is president of the Institute for Microwaves and Antennas (IMA). T. Zwick became selected as a distinguished microwave lecturer for the 2013 - 2015 period. He is author or co-author of over 200 technical papers and over 20 patents.

Last Updated on 31 May 2014